Career Is Uncovering the Past Wheaton Native Finds Her Calling in Archaeology

By Skweres, Ginny | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), September 5, 1997 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Career Is Uncovering the Past Wheaton Native Finds Her Calling in Archaeology


Skweres, Ginny, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Ginny Skweres Daily Herald Correspondent

Most career dreams don't involve getting coated with dust while working in the hot sun, wearing pants, a shirt with long sleeves and a hat to prevent sunburn and insect bites.

But that scenario is a dream come true for Winifred Creamer of Wheaton.

Creamer is an archaeologist, a professor of archaeology and American Indians at Northern Illinois University in DeKalb, an adjunct curator at Chicago's Field Museum, as well as a wife and the mother of three daughters, ages 12, 10 and 6.

She'll be speaking on Saturday to the Wheaton-Glen Ellyn branch of the American Association of University Women. Her talk will begin at 9:30 a.m. at the Lake Ellyn boathouse, 645 Lenox Road, Glen Ellyn. The public is invited.

She'll focus on her current research topic, "What happened to the native people when Europeans arrived in the new world?"

She researches that question with her husband and fellow archaeologist, Jonathan Creamer.

"In Mexico City, the Spanish introduced diseases to which the native people were not immune," Creamer said. "That caused a decline in population."

"It (the New Mexico site) had enormous villages in the 1400's, and the Europeans came in the 1500's," she said.

Creamer's goal was to find out if the Europeans had the same effect on the Indian population. Did they introduce disease and cause the population to die off?

Creamer originally thought that the New Mexico village had thousands of Indians living in it. The adobe villages were huge, with 3,000 rooms.

But Creamer later discovered that only a portion of the adobes were being lived in at one time. Instead of rehabbing the old adobes, the Indians just built new ones, leaving the old ones vacant.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Career Is Uncovering the Past Wheaton Native Finds Her Calling in Archaeology
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?