Radio Election Poll Pegs Tim Williams

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 1, 1997 | Go to article overview

Radio Election Poll Pegs Tim Williams


Byline: Eric Krol

Scientific voter polls are almost never taken in local elections because they cost so much, so it's often tough to tell who is winning in Elgin City Council races until election night itself.

Be that as it may, the results of a highly unscientific radio poll conducted by WRMN (1410-AM) radio host Brad Bohlen on Thursday morning still are quite interesting.

Bohlen polled listeners for five minutes as to which three candidates they would vote for in the Feb. 25 city council primary if the election were to be held Thursday. Here are the results:

- Challenger Tim Williams and incumbents Ed Schock and John Walters: 20 votes each.

- Incumbent Bob Gilliam: 19 votes.

- Challenger Tom Sandor: 6 votes.

- Challengers Frank Scimeca and Gregg Wiley: 4 votes each.

Arguably the most amazing result is Williams' strong showing. This is Williams' first election, and as such, he doesn't figure much in the way of name recognition. The campaign still is in its early stages, but overall, the radio poll has to be a pleasant surprise for Williams.

* * *

Crowdspotting: As the hottest ticket in Elgin, it was pretty interesting to see who made it to Wednesday's appearance by George and Barbara Bush for Money magazine.

A quick check of the VIP section revealed quite a few movers-and-shakers: former city manager Leo Nelson (now of Hoffer Plastics), Councilman Terry Gavin, the bulk of the Elgin Area Unit District 46 school board, former Elgin chamber of commerce honcho Ed Kelly, Elgin historian (and former mayor) Mike Alft, Judson College President James Didier, and seated next to each other, council candidate Frank Scimeca and Michael McCall, spokesman for People Desiring Positive Change.

The most glaring omission at the Bush event, however, had to be the fact that no - count 'em, zero - representatives from the city of Elgin, the ostensible host of this whole Money project, were on stage.

* * *

First nuptial: In what might be the first occasion of its kind in Elgin history, a young mayor got married while in office for the first time last Saturday. Mayor Kevin Kelly wed Tracy Ann Kramer before about 175 people at St. Mary's Church.

Word is that the normally politically hard-nosed mayor even got a bit misty-eyed during the happy event. The mayor's brother served as best man and Councilman Gavin read Scripture. …

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