Is It Time for Ozzie to Go? Guillen and the Sox Say No, but His Critics Won't Keep Quiet as the Sox Go for It All

By Gregor, Scot | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), March 2, 1997 | Go to article overview

Is It Time for Ozzie to Go? Guillen and the Sox Say No, but His Critics Won't Keep Quiet as the Sox Go for It All


Gregor, Scot, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Scot Gregor Daily Herald Sports Writer

SARASOTA, Fla. - Ozzie Guillen has heard all of the talk.

He can't hit anymore. His 33-year-old legs are better suited for a softball diamond than a major-league setting. He's too outspoken. He's certainly not worth the $4 million he'll get this season, the final year of his contract.

And, finally, there's no way the White Sox will pick up the option they have on him for 1998.

"Hopefully, they will pick it (option) up," Guillen said as he prepares for his 13th straight season with the Sox. "But I don't think they will; that's just the way I feel. Baseball is a business, and when you've got a guy making a lot of money, you never know."

Just because Guillen thinks this might be his final season with the White Sox doesn't mean he thinks his career is coming to an end. Sure, he's heard all of the talk, but that doesn't mean the confident Venezuelan believes it.

"This will not be my last year in baseball," Guillen said. "When I see guys who are better than me, I'll leave, but I haven't seen them yet. If I can play until I'm 50 years old, I will. I'm 33 years old and I can still play."

The juices are starting to flow now, and Guillen is no longer thinking about his contract option. He's thinking about getting a new, long-term deal from his dear friend, White Sox chairman Jerry Reinsdorf.

"Jerry knows, everybody knows, I want to stay in Chicago my whole career," Guillen said. "Besides winning, that's my main goal. I've got the money, I don't need the money.

"If Jerry gave me a four-year deal and I can only play two or three years, I guarantee I would go to him and say, 'I cannot play anymore, but I'm not going to sit here and steal from you.' I'd give a year, two years of it back. I came into this game with my head up and I will leave the game with my head up."

From his winter home in Arizona, Reinsdorf said only time will determine Guillen's fate.

"It's way too premature. We have to see how the season plays out," Reinsdorf said. "First, I have to get past (Michael) Jordan and (Dennis) Rodman.

"I've always had a fond, personal feeling for Ozzie, and there aren't too many players I can say that about. But I had deeper feelings for Harold Baines and he got traded (in 1989). And I had feelings for Greg Walker and he was released.

"I would like to see Ozzie finish his career with the White Sox, but those are just personal feelings. Schu (general manager Ron Schueler) has the authority to do what he wants, and I'm not going to tie his hands. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Is It Time for Ozzie to Go? Guillen and the Sox Say No, but His Critics Won't Keep Quiet as the Sox Go for It All
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.