Aliens and Politics Keep Conspiracy Theorists Busy

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), June 30, 1997 | Go to article overview

Aliens and Politics Keep Conspiracy Theorists Busy


Byline: Bill Granger

Two key words to keep in mind: Roswell. And Rosewell.

The coverup began in 1947.

That's when aliens crash-landed in New Mexico and were rescued by a secret agency within the government.

Ironically, that's the exact same year that Martin Kennelly was picked by the Chicago machine to run for mayor.

In New Mexico, the aliens were taken by secret agents to an underground testing lab where they were studied. The aliens were not mistreated, although after a few years as guests of the government, they were examined after watching the Milton Berle show on television. Their reactions are still a secret.

In Chicago, the alien was Martin Kennelly. He was picked to run as mayor as representative of the Democratic organization in Cook County--the Machine. He was an honest man, a straight shooter, a business tycoon - and HE HAD NOTHING IN COMMON WITH THE MACHINE HE WAS PICKED TO RUN.

Like the aliens in New Mexico, Kennelly shared certain human characteristics with his captors. He had two eyes, just like the aliens depicted in drawings from eyewitnesses who saw their saucer crash land.

Like the aliens, Kennelly did not quite understand what was happening to him. As reporter Charles Cleveland of the Chicago Daily News said at the time: "In his acceptance speech, Kennelly told the party he didn't believe in spoils politics. It was a curious sight: The Machine was running a man on a slogan of 'down with us.' "

Was it a coincidence that Kennelly became the mayor in 1947 and that he was picked for the job by Col. Jacob (Jack) Arvey, the guru of the Chicago Machine, who physically resembled the aliens found in New Mexico? I don't think so.

Students of Chicago politics know that Kennelly was such an alien to local politics that he was challenged as mayor in 1955 and lost to Machine candidate Richard J. Daley, who began a successful 21-year term in the job.

During the same period, the U.S. Air Force consistently denied the existence of aliens kept in captivity from the saucer crash site in Roswell, New Mexico.

But less than two weeks ago, on the 50th anniversary of the saucer landing, the air force conveniently came up with the explanation that the aliens seen by eyewitnesses were NOT aliens at all but were human-like dummies carried aloft during air force exercises. …

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