Catholic Mission in Schools: Being a People of Hope

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 17, 1997 | Go to article overview

Catholic Mission in Schools: Being a People of Hope


The Rev. Charles Bolser, president of St. Viator High School in Arlington Heights, is embarking on his fourth decade as an educator in Catholic schools. He recently spoke with Daily Herald staff writer Diana Wallace about the changing world of Catholic education, and how his students are learning its messages.

Q: Catholic schools are getting a growing number of non-Catholic students. Has that affected how you approach religion?

A: Thirteen percent of our students are not Catholic. We're not trying to make converts. If they leave here better grounded in their own faith, we've succeeded. Diversity is a wonderful thing to strive for. Everybody benefits.

Q: What do you think attracts non-Catholics to Catholic schools?

A: They look at the environment and see a small, caring atmosphere. Here, the parents' viewpoints are heard. The values that they want taught they know are taught here. They can't get it where they're paying the taxes to get it. A Catholic perception is that parents are the first and most important teacher. Our task is to assist in their role, not to usurp it.

Q: The stereotype of Catholic education being strict and authoritarian seems to be loosening. Why the change?

A: The demarcation point is Vatican II. That was the foundation of a fundamental turning point in how the church lives in the world, operates in the world, exists in the world.

In the old days, it was a kind of blind-obedience approach: These are the rules, and as long as you memorize and obey them, that's enough. Post-Vatican II, we began to move away from the strict legalistic and authoritarian approach to try to deal with humanity in the perspective of going back to the Gospels and their message, going back to our roots. Sometimes things get muddied in legalism.

Q: How is this philosophy reflected in what you're trying to accomplish with young people?

A: We want them to understand themselves as people. They're not perfect, but neither are they devils. We want them to see that we're all connected, that we all share a human spirit. And, if that's true, what does that mean? How does that call us to act?

A Catholic school is kind of a schizophrenic act, because a Catholic school is a structure and structures tend to want conformity. But there's also a personal need to be different, a need for young people to be able to accept themselves for who they are.

Q: That's different than what their parents are used to, isn't it? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Catholic Mission in Schools: Being a People of Hope
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.