Health Day

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), October 30, 1996 | Go to article overview

Health Day


Guys - wise up about health care

Men live an average of seven years less than women, says the Schaumburg-based Illinois Academy of Family Physicians. How come? Government statistics show that men make 150 million fewer visits to doctors than women each year. But not because they're healthier. Rather, they are more likely than women to wait until a condition is advanced before seeking medical care.

"Men tend to take their health for granted and, as a result, men may not be as familiar with the healthy lifestyle decisions they can make," said Dr. Gerald D. Suchomski, president of the IAFP, in a prepared statement.

To help reverse this situation, the IAFP, with Rush Prudential Health Plans, is offering a free health quiz designed to help men learn about living longer, healthier lives. On one level, the quiz tests men on how much they know about their bodies. On another level, it encourages them to talk with their physicians about all aspects of their general health, not just particular ailments.

To get a copy of the quiz, which is available in English and Spanish, call (800) 826-7944.

Shoe leather not best thing to soothe sole

Leather-soled oxford dress shoes, long a staple in business wardrobes, may not be the best thing for your dogs. The November issue of Men's Health magazine cites research from the Center for Locomotion Studies at Pennsylvania State University showing that the twisting and turning motions while walking in leather shoes put about 30 percent more pressure on the feet than sprinting in cheap running shoes.

Shazaam! How'd they come up with that? …

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