Hair Salon Harkens Back to Traditional Barbershop

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), October 15, 1996 | Go to article overview

Hair Salon Harkens Back to Traditional Barbershop


Byline: Kim Mikus

In opening a hair salon in East Dundee, the owners attempted to keep the atmosphere of the barbershop that customers remember.

There also are slight changes at the new Little Off the Top Shoppe, a barbershop formerly owned by the late Roger Cole.

A red and white barber pole still hangs outside the window at 212 N. River St.

"Everybody likes the old barbershop feel," said co-owner Shiela Bennett-Rae.

Bennett-Rae, 29, and Cecilia Kugia, 28, are beauticians, barbers and nail beauticians.

In one of the slight changes, they added a small table in the corner of for manicures.

The women, who had worked at a West Dundee beauty salon, opened the little shop during the first week of October, said Kugia of Huntley.

The name of the shop comes from a phrase the owners hear over and over again.

When customers come in for a haircut, they say, "just take a little off the top," said Bennett-Rae of Carpentersville. "That's how we got the name, 'Little Off the Top Shoppe.' "

In addition to trims and cuts, the hair salon also offers perms, highlighting, color and children's cuts. For more, call (847) 836-9640.

* * *

Fingerhut winner: Fingerhut Corp. presented Catherine Mroczenski of Woodstock with a $10,000 check in the most recent sweepstakes.

The award was presented at Port Edwards Restaurant, 20 W. Algonquin Road, Algonquin.

The winner said she has been furnishing her apartment with Fingerhut merchandise. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Hair Salon Harkens Back to Traditional Barbershop
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.