District 15 Students Send Works across Pacific Ocean

By Tate, Alysia | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), April 29, 1996 | Go to article overview

District 15 Students Send Works across Pacific Ocean


Tate, Alysia, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Alysia Tate Daily Herald Staff Writer

A group of Palatine Township Elementary District 15 students have not only sent their artwork to Japan, but hope to send themselves there as well.

Students at Walter R. Sundling Junior High in Palatine will find out sometime next month whether they beat out the competition in the Niigata Biennial International Children's Art Exhibition.

With the help of Sundling teachers John Van Dyk and Barb Wagner, the 14 students sent in their best works of art.

They included 11 paintings and three prints, with everything from landscapes to silk-screen prints.

But it wasn't just the competition they sought by entering the contest, said Van Dyk.

The lure of a free trip to the country as a grand prize was more tempting, he said. So far, most of their works have appeared only in district and area competitions.

"If we had found out about a competition in Zaire, we would have entered that, too," said Van Dyk. "The students were thrilled about it."

This is the third year government and community officials from the northwest Japanese region have sponsored the contest, for which submissions are collected from around the world. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

District 15 Students Send Works across Pacific Ocean
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.