Run's Rules Are Made to Be Broken

By Burke, Mike | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), May 6, 1996 | Go to article overview

Run's Rules Are Made to Be Broken


Burke, Mike, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Mike Burke Daily Herald Staff Writer

The rules for an upcoming running competition in Wheaton will be as unusual as the fund-raiser itself.

The first rule for the Gaede's Wheaton Youth Outreach Fun(d) Run is fast running is not allowed.

The second rule is that fun supersedes any rule.

Skinny runners must carry the extra weight of a briefcase, and those ambitious runners who cross the finish line first win nothing.

In addition, all participants must wear a suit coat and tie over their jogging shorts and tennis shoes.

"It's a little different race," said Bill Gaede, who is organizing the event with the help of his father, Harold.

"We wanted an event that anyone could participate in," he said.

Gaede said there are plenty of ordinary 5K and 10K races out there for the athletically inclined. But this event is a fund-raiser for participants that don't have the time or inclination to train.

"We hope to get some real heavyweights out there," Gaede said.

In fact, to discourage an abundance of svelte speedsters, those weighing less than 175 pounds will have to carry a briefcase along the 1. …

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