Parents Can Do Much to Keep Children's Love of Reading Alive

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), January 30, 1996 | Go to article overview

Parents Can Do Much to Keep Children's Love of Reading Alive


Byline: Mask & Minor

It seems like obvious advice.

Yet the suggestions in a forthcoming book on reading also seem refreshingly frank in an age raging with jargon-laced debates over the merits of the "phonics" and "whole language" methods of reading instruction.

Take time to read to your children, writes Paul Kropp, a veteran teacher, novelist and reading advocate, in his new book "Raising a Reader: Make Your Child a Reader for Life."

Read to them when they are too young for school. Read to them even when they are in high school and they are cringing at the sound of your voice.

If you can't read to your children for some reason, at least set a good example for them by reading yourself and by talking about reading with them, Kropp writes.

The 200-page book, to be published this year by Doubleday, is full of tips, including how to avoid slumps that often occur in the fourth and ninth grades, sections on coping with gifted and reluctant readers and suggested titles for all ages.

The three commandments of reading, according to Kropp, are:

- Read with your child every day.

- Reach into your wallet to buy books, magazines and other reading materials for your child and yourself.

- Limit television, videos and video games, so there will be time for reading in your child's life.

Do this and your children will not only learn to read, but love reading too, Kropp claims.

* * *

Howdy, partner: Think country music is for folks downstate? Think again.

Hundreds of students at Algonquin Middle School last week clapped along and tapped their toes to the tunes of Jana Stanfield, a popular country and western songwriter. Singers including Reba McIntire and John Schnieder have sung her songs, which have sold in the millions.

During a break from her concerts, Stanfield brought her act and a message to Algonquin students.

Between songs and strolls into the gymnasium stands packed with students and teachers, Stanfield encouraged the youngsters to avoid drugs and alcohol. …

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