Jerry Reinsdorf, It's Time

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), April 7, 1996 | Go to article overview

Jerry Reinsdorf, It's Time


Byline: Scot Gregor

ANAHEIM, Calif. - This is probably going to cost me my free-meal ticket at Comiskey Park.

And I'll probably have to pay for parking. In an unsecured lot.

But, in this space, you have to call 'em like you see 'em, no matter how harsh the penalty.

With that in mind, sell the Chicago White Sox, Jerry Reinsdorf.

Are you powerful? Yes. Wealthy? Ditto. Will your basketball team, the Bulls, win 70? Minimum.

Keep the Bulls, lose your Sox.

For several reasons.

No. 1: Dating back to your boyhood days in Brooklyn, Jerry, you grew up a baseball fan.

Nothing wrong with that. But, when your hometown Dodgers moved out of Ebbets Field to a vast western expanse now known as Los Angeles, you cried. Again, nothing wrong with that.

What is wrong, though, is your public perception. As it relates to baseball.

Let's start with the White Sox' spring-training situation in Sarasota, Fla. Absolutely, positively embarrassing.

Move camp to Arizona if there's a better deal. Move to Arizona if it's going to make the club better. And if weather is a factor - it was pretty chilly in Florida this spring - play that card as well.

But to say, paraphrasing here, you want to move the White Sox to Arizona because it's more convenient to your winter home in the Phoenix area ... that's mildly stunning, to put it mildly.

Plus, the rumored new spring home is in Tucson, a two-hour drive from Phoenix, where the majority of Cactus League teams train. In Sarasota, where the Sox have trained since 1960, there are 10 teams within a 90-minute bus ride.

That's not really important, though. …

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