Boston Symphony Orchestra Performs Mahler's 'Resurrection'

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 9, 1996 | Go to article overview

Boston Symphony Orchestra Performs Mahler's 'Resurrection'


Byline: Bill Gowen

Boston Symphony Orchestra, Seiji Ozawa, conductor

- Program: Mahler, Symphony No. 2 ("Resurrection")

- Where: Orchestra Hall, 220 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago

- When: 8 p.m. today

- Tickets: $15-$53. For availability or to order by credit card call (312) 435-6666

While the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and music director Daniel Barenboim complete their "East Meets West" mini-festival this weekend, there are a couple of other area orchestral concerts worth mentioning.

The first takes place tonight at Orchestra Hall when the Boston Symphony Orchestra and longtime music director Seiji Ozawa stop here during their current North American tour. The lone work on the program is Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 2 in C Minor (the "Resurrection Symphony").

Ozawa has conducted this symphony frequently throughout his career and last summer received critical praise in the national media for his performance of the 80-minute work at Tanglewood (the BSO's summer home in Lenox, Mass.).

He will be joined on this occasion by the Chicago Symphony Chorus and soloists Heidi Grant Murphy (soprano) and Michelle DeYoung (mezzo-soprano).

The concert is part of the Lexus Great Performers Series produced by CSO/Allied Arts Presents.

The "Resurrection Symphony" was last heard here in August when Christoph Eschenbach chose the work to cap his first summer of concerts as the Ravinia Festival's music director.

Mahler worked on his second symphony off and on for several years, unable to find a suitable text to use as a basis for a desired choral final movement (loosely patterned after Beethoven's Ninth Symphony).

Finally, while attending the memorial service for the noted conductor Hans Von Bulow, he heard the choir sing Klopstock's hymn Aufersteh'n, which Mahler immediately realized was the solution he had sought for so long.

Although Bruno Walter had previously conducted the symphony's first three movements in concert a year previously, Mahler himself led the first performance of the completed symphony in Berlin in December 1895, which means it recently celebrated the centennial of its world premiere.

Performed infrequently until the late Leonard Bernstein took up Mahler's cause in the early 1960s, the "Resurrection Symphony" is now firmly entrenched in the standard symphonic repertoire. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Boston Symphony Orchestra Performs Mahler's 'Resurrection'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.