Write-In Presidential Candidate Preaches Citizenship

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), March 6, 1996 | Go to article overview

Write-In Presidential Candidate Preaches Citizenship


Sure Bob Dole and Bill Clinton and Pat Buchanan and Steve Forbes get most of the ink.

But Ed Gombos of Addison is running for president, too.

Sure, it's a write-in campaign and sure even Gombos figures he doesn't have much of a chance to win in November.

But that isn't stopping the 58-year-old from working to get out his messages.

And he has more than a few messages. He says he's written 20,000 essays since 1988 on a variety of topics, most of which center on the need for improved citizenship.

A T-shirt supplier, Gombos says he decided this was the year to run for president because it's the 100th anniversary of the modern Olympics.

"What if we had a sport of citizenship?" he asks.

The way Gombos sees it, the campaign for president should be a little like the NCAA basketball tournament.

There would be 64 super-congressional districts, see, and each of them would have eight congressional districts and each of those would have eight counties and each of those would have eight municipalities.

And it would work like this:

One candidate would emerge from each municipality and they'd run against each other. The winner would advance to the county race and then to the congressional district and so on.

Gombos thinks it would be a return to grass-roots citizenship and that the sports aspect would attract more attention than the current process.

"I'm trying to use the enthusiasm we have for sports and transfer it into real life," he said.

That's just one of many ideas he has. He's prepared position papers on Advanced Thinking Centers, Attitude Behavior Testing, Business Olympic Teams, Citizen City Teams, Door-To-Door Education, National Family Reunion Day, National Monitors, National Service to America, Project Excellence and the War on Debt, Hurt and Waste.

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