Performing and Visual Arts Schools

By Daniel, Rod | Journal of Secondary Gifted Education, Fall 2000 | Go to article overview

Performing and Visual Arts Schools


Daniel, Rod, Journal of Secondary Gifted Education


A Guide to Characteristics, Options, and Successes

Abstract

Performing and visual arts schools are found in most major cities in the United States, and their number is growing. Student success in schools of the arts is well documented, with a variety of arts schools opening each year at all grade levels. This article provides an overview of the characteristics of an effective arts education program, descriptions of the various options available for artistically talented students seeking specialized training through performing and visual arts schools, and guidelines to those interested in planning a new school for the arts.

In recent years, researchers have asserted that education in the arts develops the problem-solving and critical thinking skills required to succeed in college and in the work place (U.S. Department of Labor, 1991). Arts education gives students the opportunity to learn in different ways, understand through exploration, and realize ambiguity and subjectivity in learning. No less important, there is growing evidence that the high-level thinking skills and creativity engendered by serious education through the arts can contribute to a better-prepared force of industrial leaders who can compete in world markets (Consortium of National Arts Education Associations, 1994).

Those involved in arts and humanities training know from experience that arts education has the potential to improve learning skills, promote student achievement, enhance social skills, stimulate personal growth and development, and foster problem solving, higher order thinking, communication, teamwork, and creativity. The ability to risk failure, an essential life skill, is practiced daily in the arts. The development of all faculties of mind, the emotions, intuition, and the senses--is at the core of education in the arts and humanities (Fiske, 1999).

A 1992 U.S. Department of Education study of elementary and secondary Blue Ribbon Schools of Excellence revealed the following 10 characteristics common among the schools commended by the U.S. Department of Education and the National Endowment for the Arts for excellence in their arts education programs, as wells their academic programs:

1. The school has a philosophy/vision of education that holds that a strong arts curriculum is basic to a well-balanced educational program.

2. The leadership of the school is passionate about and committed to the value of high-quality arts education.

3. The schools are student-centered, guaranteeing access, equity, and success for all students, while maintaining differentiated levels of instruction for students with talent and motivation.

4. The curriculum is balanced and includes music; dance; drama/theater; creative writing; and visual, media, and technical arts.

5. The curriculum is skill-based, sequential, multicultural, interdisciplinary, and rigorous.

6. Instructors from high-quality arts institutions are sought to teach. They include artist/teachers, arts specialists, and highly trained classroom teachers.

7. School administrators realize that the arts need to be allotted time, space, and financial and administrative support.

8. The "school climate" is so positive that visitors often express the wish that they had gone to the school and next want to know how their children, grandchildren, or the children of friends can attend the school.

9. Strong community ties to parents, businesses, and other arts organizations characterize these schools. These schools generate excitement in their communities and support for education, generally.

10. A variety of assessment and evaluation procedures exist in these schools, including portfolios, videos, performances, auditions, visiting judges and critics, competitions, contests, art exhibits, paper- and pencil-tests, and traditional norm-referenced tests (U.S. Department of Education, 1991, pp.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Performing and Visual Arts Schools
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.