Custom Publishing Hits the Big Time; Crosby Vandenburgh Nets ESPN Contract, Seeks Further Expansion in Entertainment Industry

By Angelo, Jean Marie | Folio: the Magazine for Magazine Management, January 1989 | Go to article overview

Custom Publishing Hits the Big Time; Crosby Vandenburgh Nets ESPN Contract, Seeks Further Expansion in Entertainment Industry


Angelo, Jean Marie, Folio: the Magazine for Magazine Management


Custom publishing hits the big time

Boston--Necessity is most definitely the mother of invention, say the founders of the Crosby Vandenburgh Group (CVG), a "custom" publishing outfit that has landed a multimillion dollar contract with ESPN. In 1980, Steve Crosby and Alan Vandenburgh wanted to start a publishing company, but didn't have the capital to do so. They sought out clients who would pay the bills, and the first was the city of Boston, whose local officials hired the pair to produce a guide for the city's 350th anniversary celebration. Two years later they landed a contract to produce a 25,000 circulation guide for a cable television company. Their custom publishing company was well on its way.

$50 million contract

Now, CVG is pushing the big time. Their newest client, ESPN, Inc., the cable television station that's all sports, is said to be paying CVG as much as $50 million over several years to produce a monthly program guide to televised sporting events. In December, TV Sports became a free standing insert in Sunday newspapers in 10 major markets, including New York City, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Chicago. Circulation is two million.

TV Sports lists network as well as cable events, and carries national advertisers. Philip Morris and RJR Nabisco were scheduled to buy space in the first issue at a black-and-white ad page rate of $21,500, according to James Barry, president of CVG's custom magazine division.

The TV Sports contract captured almost as much press as Time Inc.'s $185 million purchase of half interest in Whittle Communications, the better-known big brother of custom publishing. Crosby admires Whittle's pluck in launching Special Reports (a series of waiting room publications that sought to displace most traditional publications displayed in doctors' offices). Although the tone of Whittle's ads for Special Reports is a bit too strident for his tastes, Crosby thinks the aggressiveness is bringing much needed attention to the custom publishing field. "We can thank Chris Whittle for teaching the world how to value a company like this,c says Crosby. "He has helped people understand what we do."

"The custom magazine industry hasn't crystallized yet," Crosby continues.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Custom Publishing Hits the Big Time; Crosby Vandenburgh Nets ESPN Contract, Seeks Further Expansion in Entertainment Industry
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.