Going Places

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), September 8, 1996 | Go to article overview

Going Places


For fall colors, head to North Woods

Summer's almost gone, winter's comin' on. The days are getting shorter, the nights longer. The silver lining in this cloud? Fall colors in Wisconsin.

Yes, our brothers and sisters to the north know how to put on a good tree show. And to allow you to better take advantage of the changing leaves, the Wisconsin Division of Tourism has printed a free brochure with dates of local festivals and suggestions of things to do.

The Wisconsin tourism folks also have a toll-free phone number, (800) 432-TRIP. Call that number to get a copy of the brochure. Also, operators will be able to tell you where and when color seekers can find peak fall foliage. Wisconsin's "color odyssey" typically lasts six to eight weeks, from mid-September through early November.

Old Virginia boasts great foliage, too

Speaking of fall travel, you could do worse than visit Williamsburg, Va., with side trips to nearby Jamestown and Yorktown. Pretty country. The tourism people there are getting the word out via a 55-page brochure that describes the history of the area and the events and accommodations available there. Call the Williamsburg Area Convention & Visitors Bureau at (800) 368-6511. They'll send you the booklet and tell you whatever else you need to know. Autumn, by the way, is an ideal time to travel. Prices typically are lower, the crowds diminished and the weather agreeable.

And, hey, what about Illinois?

While we're on this autumn travel-changing colors jag, a good way to check out Illinois geography would be via train between the Chicago area and Galena. …

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