TRAVL: Land of Lager and Lego; EASY TO GET TO AND VERY WELCOMING - DENMARK IS PACKED WITH HISTORY AND CULTURE

Coventry Evening Telegraph (England), February 1, 2001 | Go to article overview

TRAVL: Land of Lager and Lego; EASY TO GET TO AND VERY WELCOMING - DENMARK IS PACKED WITH HISTORY AND CULTURE


Byline: Alison Williams

THERE are two big myths about Denmark. The first is that it is a long way from Britain and the second is that it is expensive.

Well, I had to confess I did need to look up Aarhus - the country's second city after the capital Copenhagen - on an atlas before I set off.

But at just an hour and a half from London Stanstead Airport, it is closer than parts of Spain and France.

As for the cost, well, food and drink were more or less London prices but for a long weekend, the city could easily be done on a budget if people choose with care.

Denmark is most famous for vikings, bacon, lager, Lego and saying no to the euro.

And while Copenhagen is the best known destination, Aarhus the surrounding area of Jutland can give it a pretty good run for its money.

First thing to be said is that the locals are phenomenally friendly and very welcoming to visitors. With English as the second language, everyone is keen to chat.

Aarhus, promoted as the world's smallest big city, has a large student population and a fairly liberal outlook on life - not to mention a relaxed attitude to drinking and socialising.

A morning business meeting or breakfast is usually got underway with a rousing shout of "skol!" and a shot of Danish schnapps to get proceedings under way and the digestive juices flowing.

The city itself would be great for a long weekend, with quirky shopping and lovely canalside cafe bars in the Latin Quarter and an attractive historic waterside centre to stroll around.

That's not to mention the dozens of museums - including ones chronicling science, vikings, women, firefighting and the town itself.

The most famous of all and certainly worth a few hours is Den Gamle By, which has more than 75 historic buildings painstakingly moved and reconstructed from all over Denmark into a full village to chart the social and architectural changes from the Renaissance to the First World War.

With unique collections toys, clocks, chinaware and clothes, the living museum is not only picturesque, but entertaining and educational for visiting youngsters. …

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TRAVL: Land of Lager and Lego; EASY TO GET TO AND VERY WELCOMING - DENMARK IS PACKED WITH HISTORY AND CULTURE
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