Talking through Time Des Plaines Historical Society Exhibits a Display of a Communication Culture

By McLaughlin, Amy | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 17, 2001 | Go to article overview

Talking through Time Des Plaines Historical Society Exhibits a Display of a Communication Culture


McLaughlin, Amy, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Amy McLaughlin Daily Herald Staff Writer

You could be dating yourself if you admit you learned how to type on a manual typewriter.

And, people might be able to zero in on your birth year if you tell them you've never even seen a manual typewriter.

Whatever your age, the Des Plaines Historical Society is showing pieces of communication history as a reminder how things have changed in the past 100 years.

The exhibit "From Dots & Dashes to the Digital Divide: Communication in the 20th Century" may have something for everybody.

The interactive display features everything from teletype and telegraph machines - two of the earliest pieces of equipment used for messaging over a wide area - all the way up to today's computer keyboard.

It explores the history of communication: speech, musical notes and writing.

The exhibit opened at the beginning of the month and will continue through the end of the year.

Remember rotary phones, which required sticking a finger in the dial and turning it to make a call? There are fewer people these days who do.

"You'd be surprised how many kids come in here and had never seen a rotary phone," historical museum director Joy Matthiessen said. …

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