States Can Be Made Accountable for Small Arms

By Martinic, Gabriela | UN Chronicle, Fall 2000 | Go to article overview

States Can Be Made Accountable for Small Arms


Martinic, Gabriela, UN Chronicle


Small children have big dreams; small arms cause big Stragedies", said Deputy Secretary-General Louise Frechette at the inauguration of the exhibit on "Taking Aim at Small Arms: Defending Children's Rights". This statement dearly illustrates the three dimensions of the problem caused by small arms and light weapons. The first dimension is the humanitarian concern for the victims and the easy access to those weapons, particularly by children and teenagers. The second is the economic concern, because resources are used to buy small arms instead of applying them to development. And the third is the security concern, since the excessive and destabilizing accumulation of small arms and light weapons has a considerable impact at the subregional, regional and global levels.

The existence in various parts of the world of small arms and light weapons that exceed the level necessary for legitimate security and defence needs, and especially the illicit transfer of such weapons often associated with destabilizing activities, is a long-standing problem of a complex nature which, in order to be solved, requires a proportional and integrated approach to security and development. This article focuses on the security dimension, starting with the premise that States can be made accountable for small arms and light weapons.

The transfer of illicit arms is one of the international community's main concerns, since it threatens both the internal security of States and subregional, regional and global stability. Illicit transfers violate national laws and international law. States, as responsible members of the international community, must therefore participate and encourage the functioning of systems and regimes for the control of arms transfers, whether agreed to at the multilateral, regional or subregional level, or even as a result of unilateral decisions, in order to prevent the illicit arms trade.

States are aware of the magnitude of the task as well as of the need to address it. So, what are the measures that States can take to tackle the problem and be "accountable" regarding small arms and light weapons? There are three areas that require States to enact adequate laws, regulations and procedures to control activities regarding small arms and light weapons.

* Control on manufacture (restricting manufacturing to those authorized by States, marking arms, destroying unmarked or inadequately marked arms);

* Control on transfers (restricting brokering activities to authorized manufacturers or brokers, adopting end-user certificates, strengthening customs control);

* Control on stocks (monitoring and record-keeping, requiring secure storage). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

States Can Be Made Accountable for Small Arms
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.