Catholic Groups Oppose Pill Bill

By Hyslop, Margie | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 2, 2001 | Go to article overview

Catholic Groups Oppose Pill Bill


Hyslop, Margie, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


ANNAPOLIS - Catholic organizations spoke against a proposal yesterday that advocates say could prevent thousands of abortions in the state.

The measure would require all hospitals and health care facilities in the state to provide information about emergency contraception as well as contraception itself or a referral to get it when they treat rape or incest victims.

The service already is provided at 15 hospitals in the state that are specially equipped to treat and gather evidence from sexual-assault victims.

"Time is of the essence; many clinics are not open on Saturday and Sunday when most of these incidents occur," said Judith DeSarno, president of the National Family Planning and Reproductive Health Association.

The measure would make it easier for victims to obtain medication - essentially a high-dose version of the birth-control pill, but not the controversial RU-486 pill - that has been available for 30 years but few women know about, said the bill's sponsor, Delegate Cheryl Kagan, Montgomery County Democrat.

When the medication, which consists of two pills taken 12 hours apart, is taken within 12 hours of intercourse it is 99.5 percent effective, but it must be taken within 72 hours, advocates stress.

Chances of pregnancy increase 50 percent if the pills are taken more than 12 hours after the assault, they said.

"It's safe, effective and underutilized," said Ronald Orleans, medical director of Capital Women's Care, a physician's group that operates in Montgomery and Prince George's counties.

But the pills aren't the only emergency contraception covered by the bill. Licensed health care facilities would be required to provide any federally approved drug or device "that prevents pregnancy after sexual intercourse."

Health care providers wouldn't be required to dispense contraceptive medication or devices, but would have to provide victims information and a referral to a provider who would dispense them.

But that "conscience clause" didn't satisfy the Maryland Catholic Conference or the Catholic Medical Association.

Dr. Louis C. Breschi, a urologist testifying for the Catholic Medical Association, said the move would violate long tradition of not forcing health care providers or institutions to violate religious or moral beliefs on contraception or abortion.

"Catholic institutions don't oppose government's rights to establish policy" but do object to government abridging their religious liberty, Dr. Breschi said.

The Roman Catholic Church opposes all forms of artificial birth control and teaches that conception begins at fertilization. And some contraceptive methods to be made available under the bill could prevent fertilized eggs from becoming implanted.

"The church's position is that if there's no evidence of conception," contraceptives could be administered, said Jeff Caruso, testifying for the Maryland Catholic Conference.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Catholic Groups Oppose Pill Bill
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.