Women in Sports, Literature, Music Getting Their Due

By Vitello, Barbara | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), March 2, 2001 | Go to article overview

Women in Sports, Literature, Music Getting Their Due


Vitello, Barbara, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Barbara Vitello Daily Herald Staff Writer

To celebrate women's history month, we devote this week's column to great women in sports, art, literature and music, plus a few suggestions on where to enjoy a bit of each.

Babe Didrikson Zaharias: Mildred Ella Didrikson - nicknamed "Babe" for the Babe Ruth-like homeruns she hit playing softball - excelled at a number of sports, including basketball (as a member of the All America team from 1930 to 1932), track and field (she won two gold medals in the 1932 Olympics) and golf where she won 17 straight championships in 1947. She followed that with wins at the British Ladies Amateur and the U.S. Women's Open.

On the links: Play 18 at Lake County's Fort Sheridan Golf Course. Located on the former military base at 3650 George Bell Drive (Sheridan Road at Old Elm), Highland Park, the public course offers a great view of Lake Michigan. (847) 266-2120.

Afterward, laugh it up at Zanies, 230 Hawthorn Court, Vernon Hills. (847) 549-6030.

Helen Frankenthaler: Inspired by artists like Jackson Pollock and Arshile Gorky, painter Helen Frankenthaler was among the second wave of Abstract Expressionists. Admired for her lyricism, Frankenthaler developed a technique where she thinned paint and used it to stain unprimed canvases.

Like modernism? Try Chicago's Museum of Contemporary Art, 220 E. Chicago Ave. Although the collection doesn't include Frankenthaler's work, it offers plenty to delight the eye and the mind. Don't leave before sampling the fare at Pucks at the MCA. (312) 280-2660.

Anne Sexton: Confessional poet Anne Sexton chronicled her emotional breakdown in poems of uncompromising self-examination. She began to write seriously in her 20s while attending Boston University where she studied with poet Robert Lowell.

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