The Office of Humanitarian Assistance and Demining: Supporting Humanitarian Needs around the Globe

By Walters, Tome H., Jr. | DISAM Journal, Winter 2000 | Go to article overview

The Office of Humanitarian Assistance and Demining: Supporting Humanitarian Needs around the Globe


Walters, Tome H., Jr., DISAM Journal


Walters, Jr.,, Tome H.

I am delighted to introduce this section of the DISAM Journal relating to the responsibilities of Defense Security Cooperation Agency's (DSCA) Office of Humanitarian Assistance and Demining (HA/D) and how it fits within our mission of security cooperation. On March 13, 1998, personnel assigned to the Defense Department's humanitarian assistance and demining programs in the Pentagon were reassigned to DSCA from the office of the Under Secretary of Defense (Policy) pursuant to a decision reflected in the Defense Reform Initiative (DRI). The goal of the DRI was to free policy staff to concentrate on corporate level policy, planning, and oversight -- those missions were assigned to the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low Intensity Conflict. Program management and resources were consolidated under a single program manager to capitalize on the expertise of the DSCA security assistance staff.

Humanitarian activities conducted by the Department of Defense (DoD) are not new. For a number of years, specific congressional authorizations have mandated humanitarian activities by the Department aimed at alleviating human suffering and enabling struggling nations to develop democratic government and stable economies. In addition, the U.S. military has a long history of meeting human need while seeing to the defense of the nation -- a tradition that reaches back to the leadership of General George Washington as he commanded the first American troops.

Today, in part through security cooperation programs, the DoD maintains unique operational, material, logistical, and organizational capabilities to provide humanitarian assistance worldwide. DoD's global reach, unrivaled infrastructure and highly trained and professional personnel allow the American military to respond rapidly and effectively to meet humanitarian assistance requirements in support of U.S. national security and foreign policy interests.

The Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster, and Civic Aid (OHDACA) appropriation primarily funds DoD humanitarian assistance activities. The OHDACA programs support the U.S. military in meeting two requirements of the U.S. national security strategy and in turn, the DSCA mission. The first is to maintain a robust presence overseas aimed at shaping the international security environment in a manner that deters would-be aggressors, strengthens friends and allies, and promotes peace and stability in regions of tension. The second is for U.S. forces to respond effectively when called upon to assist the victims of storms, earthquakes and other natural or manmade disasters.

Functions accomplished by DSCA for the DoD humanitarian assistance (HA) program include management of the Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster, and Civic Aid appropriation; oversight of the geographical commanders-in-chief's (CINC's) operational demining, humanitarian and civic assistance (HCA) programs, and the DoD humanitarian assistance program (HAP). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Office of Humanitarian Assistance and Demining: Supporting Humanitarian Needs around the Globe
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.