Counselor Education and Supervision: On-Line Peer Review Editing, On-Line Submissions, and Publishing Articles on the World Wide Web

By Smaby, Marlowe H.; Maddux, Cleborne D. et al. | Counselor Education and Supervision, March 2001 | Go to article overview

Counselor Education and Supervision: On-Line Peer Review Editing, On-Line Submissions, and Publishing Articles on the World Wide Web


Smaby, Marlowe H., Maddux, Cleborne D., Zirkle, Denise S., Henderson, Norma J., Counselor Education and Supervision


The authors describe a 5-phase implementation plan in which the staff of Counselor Education and Supervision will use the World Wide Web (the Web) for editing manuscripts for the journal, and potential authors will use the Web for submitting manuscripts for publication consideration. Documentation of the steps taken may provide guidance and help for current and future editors of academic journals. In addition, possible future uses of the Web and the Internet for expanding and enhancing publication options beyond traditional print media are discussed.

There have been phenomenal increases during the last few years in the size and popularity of the Internet and the World Wide Web (the Web). Although estimates vary, the Web is currently approaching one billion pages (Murphy, 1998). Because of this growth, the Web is beginning to affect nearly every walk of life. It is no surprise, therefore, that staff of scholarly publications are beginning to use the new electronic media. This trend has been accelerated by the rising costs that are associated with traditional print publishing and by financial crises faced by many university libraries. To respond to these financial problems and to capitalize on the popularity of the Internet and the Web, publishers and editors of scholarly journals have begun to look to these new resources for alternatives to traditional hard-copy publishing.

According to O'Donnell (1995), electronic publishing was competing with traditional publishing as early as 1995. At that time, he made the following prediction:

   Extrapolating from the success of journals that are currently published
   electronically, it is clear that electronic media will capture a large
   share of scholarly publication in the next five years, and that printed
   media will not be competitive in journal publication beyond a few more
   decades. (p. 183)

According to Wood (1998), "the introduction and wide acceptance of the Internet, and in particular the World Wide Web by researchers ... has provided exciting new opportunities for experimenting with the process of scholarly communication" (p. 173). Tomlins (1998) goes even further, suggesting that editors have "an absolute obligation to respond to the development of electronic publication" (p. 136).

Journal editors have adopted a variety of schemes for integrating the Internet and the Web into their editorial procedures. Anderson (1997) identifies four categories or models:

1. Publications that are available only on the Web

2. Publications that contain 50% to 100% of hard-print articles, often enhanced with additional material

3. Internet or Web-based tables of contents and abstracts of the hard-print articles with the option for viewers to purchase full-text downloads of the articles

4. Tables of contents that are intended to help market subscriptions to potential users

During the past 2 years, the staff of Counselor Education and Supervision (CES) has been moving from traditional editorial procedures to using on-line submissions, reviewing, and editing of manuscripts. In making these changes, we realized quickly the importance of training everyone who is involved in these procedures. This point is also emphasized by O'Donnell (1995), who maintains that effective training is crucial to the success of the process.

The purpose of this editorial is (a) to describe the steps taken by the editor of CES for using the Web for on-line peer review editing, (b) to present plans for providing future on-line training for authors who use the Web to submit manuscripts for publication consideration, and (c) to explore possibilities for supplementing hard-copy journal issues with articles that are published on the Web.

A Five-Phase Implementation Plan

The editor of CES decided to move from traditional to on-line procedures, using a series of phases or steps, each of which involved a more ambitious implementation of on-line procedures.

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