North versus South: Gaining Insight from Elementary Education Majors Enrolled in Elementary Physical Education Methods

Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, March 2001 | Go to article overview

North versus South: Gaining Insight from Elementary Education Majors Enrolled in Elementary Physical Education Methods


Jeanne Raudensky, Shepherd College, and Kathy Haas, Malone College

Providing meaningful course content and activities to preservice teachers is both a challenge and a dilemma when teaching a physical education methods course involving an extremely high ratio of elementary education majors. Often, nonmajors enter this particular course with limited content knowledge (CK) in physical education, and teacher educators are faced with the assignment of providing a "basic" understanding of the role physical education plays in child development (Kirchner & Fishburne, 1999). Previous responses indicated a high percentage of students from a flagship university in the south had experienced either very limited or no opportunity for physical education taught by a physical education specialist. What they did experience was a meager representation of instruction from a coach of a high school sport team. Students from a college in the north reportedly had numerous experiences delivered by a physical education specialist throughout their elementary years. This study had a two-fold purpose: ( a) to examine the perceptions and beliefs of preset-vice teachers enrolled in elementary health and physical education methods; and (b) to identify changes that occurred over time as a result of active participation. Participants in the study included five sections of undergraduate students (n = 101). Three groups represented a university from the south and two groups represented a college from the north. Elementary methods class was a requirement for all education majors seeking state licensure, and designed to prepare preservice teachers with content related to materials and methods for teaching health and physical education in the elementary schools. All classes were 75 mm and met twice per post during a 15-post semester. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

North versus South: Gaining Insight from Elementary Education Majors Enrolled in Elementary Physical Education Methods
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.