Delphion Updates Web Site, Enables Access to Derwent World Patents Index

By Lambert, Nancy | Information Today, April 2001 | Go to article overview

Delphion Updates Web Site, Enables Access to Derwent World Patents Index


Lambert, Nancy, Information Today


Remember the IBM Intellectual Property Network? Last year, with funding from the Internet Capital Group, IBM spun it and other technologies out to form Delphion, an independent company. Delphion recently announced some changes and one major addition to its resources.

First, the Delphion site (http://www.delphion.com) has a new look and new navigational capabilities. The navigation bar on top of every page (except the home page) has extensive sub-menus, so that users can reach more parts of the site directly from wherever they are. A click on the Delphion logo (upper left) takes users back to the home page. Links to a site map and online help are available on the bottom of every page. A menu that runs down the left side of most pages takes searchers directly to different search options: quick, Boolean, advanced, or patent-number.

Second, patents available for licensing are now directly searchable. In the old IBM and Delphion systems, patents were marked with a pink dot if their owners wanted to license them to outside buyers. However, you couldn't search for a subset of patents marked with the pink dot; you had to pick them out from broader searches. Fortunately, that has just changed. Licensing buttons still show up in normal search results. But also, if you click on IP Listings (in the submenu under IP Search), you can retrieve a search form that works only on patents listed as available for licensing. The service allows you to search with all the parameters of a normal subject search. You can then click on the blue "L" (which replaced the pink dot) to retrieve contact information for the patent's owner. Each license button costs the patent owner $150 per year.

Third, even if a patent isn't listed with a licensing button, you can still investigate the possibility of licensing it. From a Delphion record--which covers WO (World), US (U.S. Patent and Trademark Office), EP (European Patent Office), and JP (Japanese Patent Office) patents--you can click on the "Inquire Regarding Licensing" button to fill out a form that goes back to Delphion. Delphion, in turn, refers you to a technology-transfer specialist. The specialist helps you contact the patent owner and negotiate possible licensing.

The biggest news is that users may now search the Derwent World Patents Index via the Delphion site. Derwent on Delphion is available to both subscribers and nonsubscribers.

For readers not familiar with Derwent, the organization processes and mounts data from published and granted patents from over 40 sources-both individual countries and multicountry patenting authorities like the European Patent Office (EP patents) and the Patent Cooperation Treaty (WO patents). In the process, Derwent adds considerable value to the patent information: descriptive titles and extensive abstracts, International Patent Classes from all the patent family members, and multiple levels of Derwent-created subject indexing.

Traditionally, all but the broadest subject indexing has been available only to companies that subscribe to Derwent--a subscription that provides access to all the indexing over all subject areas costs around $100,000 per year. The Derwent mounting on Delphion for the first time gives nonsubscribers access to the "deep indexing" (manual codes, chemical codes, polymer indexing, ring index numbers, compound numbers, and Derwent registry numbers). …

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Delphion Updates Web Site, Enables Access to Derwent World Patents Index
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