House Education Committee Assigns Responsibility for HBCU, HSI Programs to New Subcommittee

By Dervarics, Charles | Black Issues in Higher Education, March 1, 2001 | Go to article overview

House Education Committee Assigns Responsibility for HBCU, HSI Programs to New Subcommittee


Dervarics, Charles, Black Issues in Higher Education


Democratic committee members say shift means second-class status for minority institutions

An unexpected but heated debate on congressional oversight of Black colleges is threatening to thwart efforts at bipartisan education policy early in 2001.

And the partisan rancor is surfacing from what is usually a mundane procedural issue: the responsibilities of subcommittees in the U.S. House of Representatives.

Republicans on the House Education and the Workforce Committee in February unveiled changes in the structure and jurisdiction of the subcommittees under its umbrella. Under this plan, a new subcommittee on 21st Century Competitiveness will oversee nearly all Higher Education Act (HEA) programs -- except for aid to historically Black colleges and universities, Hispanic-serving institutions and a few small programs.

Instead, these remaining programs would be grouped with juvenile justice, child abuse and runaway youth programs under another new subcommittee, called Select Education.

The plan drew immediate criticism at the committee's organizational meeting, as Congressional Black Caucus and Congressional Hispanic Caucus members say the move may mean second-class status for minority-serving colleges. In past years, all higher education programs -- including aid to HBCUs and HSIs -- fell under the same subcommittee.

"It sends a dangerous signal that Black colleges and HSIs do not deserve to be part of higher education and competitiveness," says Rep. Donald Payne, D-N.J., a former CBC chairman, who noted he was "personally offended" by the move.

"It's a slap in the face to those institutions of learning. To put Black colleges and HSIs with juvenile justice and child abuse certainly sends the wrong signal," he adds.

The new 21st Century Competitiveness panel is "where you will deal with higher education" says Rep. Major Owens, D-N.Y. "We see the movement as segregating [HBCUs and HSIs] from other higher education concerns."

Republicans countered that they have no hidden agenda, claiming they simply wanted to reorganize issues and subcommittees in a more coherent manner. "This move was in no way meant to diminish the importance of these institutions," says Rep. John Boehner, R-Ohio, the newly elected chairman of the Education and Workforce panel.

According to Boehner and other GOP lawmakers, programs for students -- such as financial aid -- would fall under the 21st Century Competitiveness subcommittee, while programs for institutions, including HBCUs, would move to the Select Education subcommittee.

But Owens noted that appearances are important. "I don't think there's any malice here," he says. "But it's about perception -- whether these programs [for HBCUs] belong in the same category with social problems," such as child abuse and juvenile delinquency.

The committee's senior Democrat, Rep. George Miller, of California, also termed the reorganization a mistake. "It's about attitude and appearance and message and status," he says in arguing against the plan.

Some supporters of the new structure say they believe that HBCUs and HSIs would gain visibility under the new plan. They note that the chairman of the new Select Education subcommittee, Rep. …

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House Education Committee Assigns Responsibility for HBCU, HSI Programs to New Subcommittee
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