Tap into Today's Apps: Benefitting from Browser Power

By DuBois, Fred | Journal of Property Management, March 2001 | Go to article overview

Tap into Today's Apps: Benefitting from Browser Power


DuBois, Fred, Journal of Property Management


It's 2001 and spring is right around the corner. For the multifamily real estate community, that translates to moving time. At this very moment, all across your city, prospective renters are jumping on the Web to begin their search for a new apartment home. Before they make their selection, they'll want to view the floor and site plans, determine the price range, apply for the apartment and institute the required credit check--all via the Web. Of course, they'll still want to talk with the leasing agent directly about specifics, but increasingly, browser-based Web applications are making the apartment rental decision an easy one. By providing this kind of outstanding information, property managers can more readily turn prospects into residents.

The new resident can then sign up in advance for broadband internet access, utilities, telephone, renter's insurance and cable-all through a browser-based application. All that remains is for the resident to come into the office for ten minutes to sign the lease package created from the on-line application with all attachments included and pick up the keys. In the back office, the company has collected important demographic information about the resident and included that information in a data warehouse that is mined by a sophisticated OnLine Analytical Processing ("OLAP") tool tied to the property financials delivered over the Web.

The example of online customer-oriented activity for an apartment company described above would be nearly impossible with the DOS or stand-alone Windows-based software products for the real estate industry that still dominate the marketplace today. However browserbased applications are hitting the real estate technology marketplace in a big way that will significantly change a real estate company's interaction with its customers: prospects, tenants/residents, employees, suppliers, vendors and investors.

Benefits of Browser-Based Apps

For a real estate company, viewing property leasing, investor relations, property management, and accounting activities through the customers' eyes is not a new trend brought on by browser-based applications. However, these applications facilitate a more reliable, useful, and personalized interaction with all customers of a real estate company (See Chart 1).

Customer relationships can be enhanced through the use of these applications because they provide an efficient, easy to use, and reliable way for the customer to interact with the real estate company. A tenant/resident who receives one-hour service each time they submit a service order through the property Web site will feel that the company can be relied upon. If an investor gets an immediate answer to a question posted through the Web, that investor's satisfaction with the company will be increased. When a supplier sees the volume of product or service purchasing from a company increase, that supplier's openness to price reductions might be improved.

Integration of the data generated by browser-based applications as customers move through the relationship from prospect to resident/tenant is important in providing a seamless customer experience. To better handle this complicated relationship, some companies are implementing content management applications to manage the volume of online content being created and delivered to residents/tenants.

Customer loyalty also can be better maintained through the use of browser-based applications by providing timely responses to service issues, additional service offerings available through partner sites, brand consistency, and familiarity with your company's property locations in other cities.

Another factor to consider is that people using the tools delivered through browser-based applications need an easy-to-use, intuitive interface with strong "help" capabilities. Browser-based applications usually provide a more interactive "help" capability through an online software support desk and knowledge Web sites, which is a key benefit for browser-based applications. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Tap into Today's Apps: Benefitting from Browser Power
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.