InfoWindow Delivers Interactive Video on a Touch Screen

T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education), November 1988 | Go to article overview

InfoWindow Delivers Interactive Video on a Touch Screen


InfoWindow Delivers Interactive Video On a Touch Screen

There's a Chinese axiom that says: I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.

Nowhere is this ancient philosophy more apparent than in multisensory interactive videodisc, which allows student users to learn through doing in a variety of educational and training settings.

Computer-controlled, interactive videodisc systems such as IBM's InfoWindow are enabling students and other users to "experience" or retrieve a variety of pre-programmed materials, information, skills, tasks and instruction, by simply touching the system's TV-like screen.

InfoWindow is a dynamic, computer-controlled learning system, combining the power of the personal computer with the imagery and excitement of videodisc technology.

A chemistry student, for example, can use the system to simulate realistic experiments, mixing different chemicals and ingredients to see the effects of those actions--including an explosion--without fear of blowing up a chemistry lab or facing personal injury.

Computer simulation of the lab experience also eliminates the cost of chemicals and the need for disposing of toxic wastes that result from such experimentation.

A Realistic Environment

Not only does InfoWindow utilize the multi-sensory elements of touch, sound and vision, it also combines the capabilities of radio, film projectors, the typewriter, television and the computer into one effective learning experience.

Realism is achieved by videotaping or filming instructional material and programming it onto videodiscs for instantaneous retrieval by the user.

Because of its ease of use--symbols appear on the system's video screen and guide the user through the lesson or materials--no previous computer knowledge or use is necessary.

The system's random-access and playback capabilities permit branching, the ability to pursue different alternatives as part of the learning process.

An InfoWindow drug awareness program developed by a high school consortium, for example, allows students using InfoWindow to see the consequences of their decisions regarding the use of drug and aclohol in a "simulated party" situation (see accompanying story).

Variations in the party situation are virtually limitless, and the story unfolds differently depending upon choices entered into the system by the student.

A Typical Configuration

InfoWindow consists of an IBM touch-sensitive video display unit, an IBM Personal Computer or Personal System/2 and an optional videodisc player or players.

This configuration provides the capabilities of full-motion film or video, as well as still video images. The video can be overlaid with text and graphics from the personal computer, as well as narration, music or sound effects.

Up to 54,000 pictures or frames of film or video can be stored on each side of a 30-minute video and retrieved randomly in real time.

Filmed or videotaped images can be viewed at normal running speed, slow motion, fast motion or in a freeze-frame mode for as long as desired.

InfoWindow was originally developed by IBM for employee use at IBM Guided Learning centers, which are dedicated to self-paced, onsite educational training. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

InfoWindow Delivers Interactive Video on a Touch Screen
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.