West Coast Print Fairs Deemed `Exhausting' but `Fruitful'

By Meyers, Laura | Art Business News, April 2001 | Go to article overview

West Coast Print Fairs Deemed `Exhausting' but `Fruitful'


Meyers, Laura, Art Business News


LOS ANGELES--For years, the West Coast members of the New York-oriented International Fine Print Dealers Association (IFPDA) lobbied for their own, regional showcase. But attempts during the 1990s to sponsor several iterations of a large-scale, Los Angeles-based Works On Paper Show all struggled and foundered.

Finally, two years ago, the print dealers settled on an event that seems to be working. Print Fair Week is a series of smaller shows in San Francisco, San Diego, Santa Barbara and Los Angeles. Held the last week of January through Feb. 3, this year's "week" actually lasted closer to two and began with an inaugural Seattle outing. Some 21 print dealers, including East Coasters, made the trek up and down the West Coast. For those print dealers and regional collectors, the five West Coast Fine Print Fairs offered abundant spoils.

"It's an exhausting series of shows, especially now that it's expanded to five," observed Daniel Lienau, owner of Annex Galleries in Santa Rosa, Calif. "The turnout has been fantastic. Starting in Seattle, it was jammed from the moment the show opened to the moment it closed. In San Diego, we did very well. In general, I like these little shows without backboards. Collectors are forced to look through the bins at all the prints--and for dealers, it's a lot cheaper to produce [a booth]."

For attendees--many of them serious print collectors--the intimate shows gave them a chance to actually handle and closely examine the fine prints they were interested in. As an added benefit, the shows' public hours were free of charge (though preview benefits were held in several of the venues) since the art dealers themselves just divvied up the room costs.

"The scale of this show is more agreeable than most art fairs since it isn't so overwhelmingly large," observed Jonathan Greenberg, print specialist at Sothebys.com, who came from New York to attend the Los Angeles Fine Print Fair Feb. 3. "Anyone who is a collector was able to get the attention of the dealers and vice-versa. And what really brought me out here was that the selection of dealers is very strong."

The gallery owners and private dealers who participated in the shows specialize in a wide and eclectic range of works on paper, from etchings, lithographs, drawings, sketches, illustrated books, photographs, watercolors and woodblock prints to modern limited editions. The art works cumulatively covered 500 years, ranging from 16th-century European etchings and 17th-century Ukiyo-e Japanese prints to Abstract Expressionist and cutting edge contemporary lithographs. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

West Coast Print Fairs Deemed `Exhausting' but `Fruitful'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.