PETS AND THEIR PEOPLE: MONKEYS TORTURED TO EDGE OF MADNESS ...AND YOU PAID FOR IT; EURO SCANDAL 1: Help Stop the Suffering of Sad Apes Kept in Horrific Squalor at Hellish Research Lab; EXCLUSIVE

The People (London, England), April 15, 2001 | Go to article overview

PETS AND THEIR PEOPLE: MONKEYS TORTURED TO EDGE OF MADNESS ...AND YOU PAID FOR IT; EURO SCANDAL 1: Help Stop the Suffering of Sad Apes Kept in Horrific Squalor at Hellish Research Lab; EXCLUSIVE


Byline: KATY WEITZ

A DISTRESSED monkey squats in a tiny, filth-encrusted cage, rocking himself obsessively backwards and forwards.

The pitiful creature stares blankly through the iron bars - an almost human expression of despair on his face.

The chimp is just one of 500 macaque monkeys kept in horrific conditions at Europe's last primate laboratory - an animal hell-hole that is paid for by YOU as a European taxpayer.

Now we are calling on our army of caring readers to help end the chimps' suffering by joining a Europe-wide campaign which already has the support of concerned animal experts like Sir David Attenborough.

The monkeys at the squalid and overcrowded Biomedical Primate Research Centre in Holland are tortured to the edge of madness in a series of HIV-related experiments which many scientists believe are pointless.

The normally sociable chimps are kept isolated from one another in cages so small that they cannot even stretch their limbs.

Babies are separated from their mothers at birth, causing terrible distress to animals who normally stay with their infants for at least five years.

The monkeys spend their days banging on the bars of their cells, spitting at passers-by and smearing their cages with their own filth - all classic signs of mental trauma.

And the monkeys could live for up to 50 years in these terrible conditions.

According to the lab's own staff, some of the apes have become very sick and malnourished as a result of a shortage of personnel, a lack of clear procedures and inadequate housing.

Even the Dutch government has admitted that the laboratory does not "meet generally accepted standards" of animal welfare.

But amazingly, it continues to carry out its horrific experiments at a cost to the European taxpayer of pounds 3 MILLION a year.

Now several of Europe's leading animal welfare organisations have started a campaign to free these animals and secure a Europe-wide ban on research on apes.

Supporting the Campaign to End Experiments on Chimpanzees in Europe (CEECE), Sir David Attenborough said: "I am in favour of a European ban on the use of apes in invasive medical research. …

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PETS AND THEIR PEOPLE: MONKEYS TORTURED TO EDGE OF MADNESS ...AND YOU PAID FOR IT; EURO SCANDAL 1: Help Stop the Suffering of Sad Apes Kept in Horrific Squalor at Hellish Research Lab; EXCLUSIVE
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