A Change Will Do Us Good

By Keller, Julie | Art Business News, November 2000 | Go to article overview

A Change Will Do Us Good


Keller, Julie, Art Business News


DEAR READERS,

As you page through this month's issue of ABN, you might notice something--we've changed some things around. In an effort to meet your needs better and to make reading go a little more smoothly, we've given the magazine h face lift.

First off, we've redesigned our Contents page. Hopefully, navigating through the news, features and monthly sections of the magazine will now be easier.

We've also done a little moving. Two of ABN's most highly read sections--City Beat and Picture Gallery--have moved to the end of the magazine. Studies have shown that a good percentage of magazine readers read from end to beginning, rather than beginning to end, and we don't want to leave you backwards-readers out. Now, each month, your photographs from gallery openings, events and more will be a quick page flip away, And an in-depth look at the art community in different cities around the world will also be close at hand. This month, in honor of International Artexpo California (Nov. 2 to 5 at the Concourse Exhibition Center), we take you to San Francisco, the beautiful City by the Bay. Next month, we cross the ocean and head to the gorgeous lakeside city of Geneva, Switzerland. Does your city have a fabulous art scene? let us know--we'd love to check it out.

What face lift would be complete without a little something newt In honor of the busy fall show season (and the impending shows in the winter and spring), we've also created "The Scene," our new society page. …

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