Falling Behind in Space?

By Beichman, Arnold | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 26, 2001 | Go to article overview

Falling Behind in Space?


Beichman, Arnold, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


It's time for the Bush administration to let the American people know whether the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is going to enhance American leadership in space exploration or it is going to live on past glories.

At the moment, the White House has before it a London Times article published April 21 whose startling lead paragraph begins: "Russia has overcome all main obstacles to manned interplanetary flight and should be ready to send humans to Mars in the second decade of the 21st century, the head of a once-secret space science institute has claimed."

Anatoli Grigoriev, head of the Institute of Biomedical Problems of the Russian Academy of Sciences, publicly predicted a Russian Mars flight by 2016. The London Times correspondent, Giles Whittell, writing from Moscow quotes Mr. Grigoriev as saying that 15 years of trial and error aboard the Mir space station have given Russia unmatched experience in choosing, training, feeding and supporting the crews of space flights lasting a year or more.

It might be difficult to take seriously so spectacular a claim about a super-costly space voyage by a leading Russian space scientist when his country has been an economic basket case for more than a decade. On the other hand we should remember that Russia this month celebrated the 40th anniversary of Yuri Gagarin's first space flight, April 12, 1961. Other countries - India, China, Europe itself - are moving actively in space exploration.

The Bush administration should begin to move on the space front because it is one of the few issues in Congress that enjoys bipartisan support. There is no better way to begin than by studying a statement - "a roadmap to the future of NASA," he called it - by Wesley T. Huntress, one of the country's leading astrophysicists, presented April 3 to the House Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics. He called for a commitment to "a manifest destiny for America in space." Mr. Huntress said there are four great questions mankind hopes one day to answer: (1) Where did we come from? (2) How did life on Earth originate and evolve to make the human species? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Falling Behind in Space?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.