Regulation Review Time

By Adrianson, Alex | Consumers' Research Magazine, March 2001 | Go to article overview

Regulation Review Time


Adrianson, Alex, Consumers' Research Magazine


Secretary of Health and Human Services Tommy Thompson has announced that the implementation of new medical privacy rules issued by the Clinton Administration will be delayed until April 14. Secretary Thompson says the delay was caused by an oversight of the Clinton Administration, which did not submit the rules to Congress promptly. The 1996 Congressional Review Act says that major rules may not take effect until 60 days after they have been submitted to Congress for review. Though the new "Standards for Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information" were published in the Federal Register in December, they were never sent to Congress for review.

The new rules give patients the right to access their own health information, to obtain a copy of the information, and to request a correction of information that is inaccurate, and the right to receive an accounting of all disclosures of their information. The rules would also require health care providers to obtain written permission from patients in order to use or disclose information in the medical records for purposes other than health care. The standards also allow the Secretary of Health and Human Services to impose fines for medical privacy violations.

Secretary Thompson says the new administration is absolutely committed to achieving the goals of the new medical privacy rules. He adds that the new review period was "an opportunity to ensure that the provisions of this final rule will indeed work as intended throughout the complex field of health care, without creating unanticipated consequences that might harm patients' access to care or the quality of that care." According to estimates of the Department of Health and Human Services, health care providers would spend at least $3.8 billion to implement the requirements of the new rules if they take effect. (See "Dateline Washington," CR, December 2000 and January 2001.)

The U.S. Department of Energy is reviewing several new appliance-efficiency standards issued in the last days of the Clinton Administration, including rules for washing machines. Some critics, like the Competitive Enterprise Institute, say the new rules for washing machines would effectively mandate front-loading washing machines instead of the popular and cheaper top-loading models. The washing machine rule, which calls for a 22% reduction in energy consumption by 2004 and a 35% reduction by 2007, is being subjected to a 60-day review.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Regulation Review Time
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.