Minority Health

By Wagner, Cynthia G. | The Futurist, May 2001 | Go to article overview

Minority Health


Wagner, Cynthia G., The Futurist


Disparities in health status among groups lead to new research focus.

A new National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities has been added to the roster of specialized research centers of the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH). The new center will focus on research, training, and disseminating information about minority health conditions and about disparities in health status and access to health services.

"While the diversity of the American population is one of the nation's greatest assets, one of its greatest challenges is reducing the profound disparity in health status of America's racial and ethnic minorities, Appalachian residents, and other similar groups, compared to the population as a whole," says John Ruffin, the new center's director. Ruffin served as NIH's first associate director for research on minority health.

Among the health problems that may hit minority populations harder are AIDS, cancer, diabetes, infant mortality, and cardiovascular diseases, Ruffin points out. "The NIH has made health disparities a budget priority and an area of emphasis," he says.

Health research is another area where disparities have emerged, and the center will partner with other NIH institutes and centers to support research programs that study health disparities.

Minority health is a growing concern because, despite improvements in the health of the U.S. population as a whole over the past two decades, "there continue to be striking disparities in the burden of illness and death experienced by African Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans, Alaska Natives, Asians, and Pacific Islanders," Ruffin reports.

Moreover, minority populations are increasing faster than the rest of the population in the United States. Overall, population growth in the United States is occurring largely because of immigration, which over the past decade has added more citizens to Latino and Asian minority groups. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, one-third of the foreign-born population come from Mexico or Central American countries, and about one-fourth are from Asian countries. About 10% of the total U.S. population are foreign born--a total of more than 28 million people in 2000. By 2030, racial and ethnic minorities are projected to represent nearly 40% of the total U.S. population.

Health disparities may emerge as a consequence of differences in such factors as education and income levels. According to the Census Bureau, 67% of the foreign-born population are high-school graduates, compared with 87% of natives. And 36% of foreign-born full-time workers earned less than $20,000 in 1999, compared with just 21% of their native counterparts. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Minority Health
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.