Bush Pressed for Postal Reform; the Postal Service Needs Competition and a Flexible Work Force, Says Heritage Foundation

By Angelo, Jean Marie | Folio: the Magazine for Magazine Management, March 1989 | Go to article overview

Bush Pressed for Postal Reform; the Postal Service Needs Competition and a Flexible Work Force, Says Heritage Foundation


Angelo, Jean Marie, Folio: the Magazine for Magazine Management


Bush pressed for postal reform

Washington, D.C.--The Postal Service Reorganization Act of 1970 is obsolete, and inefficiency costs the United States Postal Service $5 billion of its $30 billion budget yearly, according to the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank that has presented recommendations for postal reform to President Bush.

The Foundation further notes that the cost of a first-class stamp has increased faster than the rate of inflation during the past 19 years, says Stephen Moore, economic policy analyst for Heritage.

The Foundation, which outlined about a dozen recommendations for change, calls for Bush to set up a Presidential committee to review the changes. This committee might study labor costs, which now account for 83 percent of postal costs. In addition, Heritage wants the Postal Service to give up its monopoly on delivering certain classes of mail.

The Postal Service has a horrendous batting average with third class mail, adds Moore. At least 70 percent of third class mail is either delivered late or not at all. "One way to improve this is to experiment with more competition," he explains. "I don't think the public would be upset about having a separate company deliver advertising fliers."

Heritage also urges President Bush to appoint pro-competition people to the Postal Board of Governors and the Postal Rate Commission. It is unlikely, however, that Bush will make any immediate appointments, because all nine governors and five commissioners are Reagan appointees with time left in their terms.

The report also calls for relaxation of work rules, since the Postal Service must now limit its part-time employees to 5 percent of its work force.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Bush Pressed for Postal Reform; the Postal Service Needs Competition and a Flexible Work Force, Says Heritage Foundation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.