Appointments: Just the Job - Office Design May Be Key to Keeping Staff

The Birmingham Post (England), May 19, 2001 | Go to article overview

Appointments: Just the Job - Office Design May Be Key to Keeping Staff


Byline: Philip Harrison

While higher salaries and bigger benefits packages were once the driving force behind employee retention strategies, employers are now beginning to realise that large pay rewards are not the only incentive behind keeping key people.

The office environment is playing an increasingly important role in encouraging loyalty amongst staff, and the corporate decision makers are now having to pay greater attention to getting the psychology of the workplace right.

Take art, for example. There's nothing like a realistic landscape photograph to help us drink in our memories of pleasant surroundings. However, stimulating and inspiring employees is not just about a strategically placed painting.

It's about totally redesigning and opening up the place in which we work. And it's about talking to office workers about what they actually want.

Surprisingly, in a recent industry survey, nearly two-thirds of employees said they had never been consulted about office decor.

What emerges when you do talk to staff is that they need to feel cared for, appreciated and to have links between office and home.

Interior corporate design has to reflect this if it is to be successful.

Whilst this was represented years ago by a few potted plants and the informality of photos and 'toys' around the desk, modern office design is starting to take this a step further.

The walls are coming down inside offices across the country.

This has led to physical changes in the working environment. …

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