Research Notes

By Stokes, Samantha; Sharpe, Virginia Ashby | The Hastings Center Report, March 2001 | Go to article overview

Research Notes


Stokes, Samantha, Sharpe, Virginia Ashby, The Hastings Center Report


A sampling of developments in The Hasting Center's research over the last six months.

The regulation of reprogenetics

Who regulates "reprogenetic" technology--the technology at the intersection of reproductive and genetic science that is changing the way we have children? How does one obtain approval for a trial on human subjects of new reprogenetic tools or techniques? How does one navigate the system? These are a few of the questions posed at the first project meeting of Reprogenetics: A Blueprint for Meaningful Moral Debate and Responsible Public Policy, held at the Center on 16-17 November 2000.

Participants' general answer is that the regulations applying to reprogenetic technologies are complex, vague, burdensome, and vary greatly from state to state. All in all, the current regulations are inadequate.

The meeting was launched with updates on the science and clinical applications of both genetic and reproductive technologies and reviews of the public policies and regulations surrounding genetic and reproductive technologies. A better understanding of the state of the art and the tangled regulation of reprogenetics is necessary for meaningful moral debate and responsible public policy.

The project is funded by the Greenwall Foundation.

New perspectives on agriculture biotechnology

The second meeting of Public Perceptions of Agricultural Biotechnology, funded by the Rockefeller Foundation, was held at The Hastings Center on 9-11 November 2000. The previous meeting had focused on European perspectives on agricultural biotechnology. This meeting brought three new perspectives to the table. Angela Wasunna, a visiting associate at The Hastings Center from Kenya, discussed the impact of agricultural biotechnology on developing nations. Robin Yeaton Woo, from George town University Center for Food and Nutrition Policy, provided insight into the logic of policymakers "inside the beltway," and Peter Sandoe, from the Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University in Denmark, discussed the relationship of biotechnology, animal welfare, and ethical concerns.

The goal of this project is to create a policy document can be disseminated to policymakers involved with agricultural biotechnology.

Research ethics

Human subjects research was the underlying theme at the Annual Fellows Meeting, held at The Hastings Center in October. Topics included gene transfer research, international research, priority setting in research funding, and new developments in the federal oversight of human research.

In what was perhaps the most vigorously debated session of the meeting, David Magnus (Center for Bioethics, University of Pennsylvania), Eric Juengst (Center for Bioethics, Case Western Reserve University), and Lana Skirboll (the National Institutes of Health) addressed different aspects of the regulation and review of gene therapy trials and the clouded issues surrounding the death of Jesse Gelsinger in 1999 in a gene transfer experiment at the University of Pennsylvania.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Research Notes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.