The Remedy Forced on a Health Insurer; PERSONAL FINANCE EDITOR

By Prestridge, Jeff | The Mail on Sunday (London, England), April 22, 2001 | Go to article overview

The Remedy Forced on a Health Insurer; PERSONAL FINANCE EDITOR


Prestridge, Jeff, The Mail on Sunday (London, England)


Byline: JEFF PRESTRIDGE

AS a campaigning personal finance newspaper, it is uplifting and invigorating when we win justice for readers.

On the facing page, we report on one such success. Until Financial Mail intervened, David Crossley was facing a bleak 2001 after his insurance company, Medical Sickness Society, decided to stop payments due under his permanent health insurance policy.

Matters had become so desperate for David and his wife Nicky that he had put his house on the market to raise much-needed cash.

However, it soon became apparent to Financial Mail that MSS had not treated David fairly.

His employer, the National Health Service, had judged him unfit to work in his profession as a dental surgeon, and his GP had agreed. MSS decided otherwise, and deprived him of his benefit.

Three months ago, we took David's case to the directors of MSS and urged them to reconsider it, along with a number of other cases.

To their credit, and in particular that of chief executive Jim Macdonald, MSS agreed.

As a result, David has now received a five-figure lump sum for backdated benefit, plus the promise of monthly benefit from his MSS permanent health insurance policy.

Quite naturally, he is overjoyed. We are pleased that justice has been done.

This is not the only victory Financial Mail has scored against MSS. Since taking up the cases of several policyholders who felt angry at MSS decisions to stop their benefit, we have managed to persuade this specialist insurer of dentists and doctors to make a number of U-turns.

David Senior, Martin Waller and Bill Dryden have all received payment of benefit in the past couple of months - payments that they would not have received had it not been for the intervention of Financial Mail.

OUR battle with MSS has not been entirely covered in glory. Far from it. For every David Crossley, there is a Doctor Sam Shohet battling to get MSS to overturn a decision to stop paying benefit.

And new cases of MSS policyholder injustice seem to crawl out of the woodwork every week.

Financial Mail will attempt to get justice for all.

In the April 5 edition of newsletter Dentistry, David Rutter of MSS said that our coverage was onesided. He also said that we had chosen to investigate their 'most difficult cases'. …

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