Scandal of the Pupils with No Textbooks

By Behar, Darren | Daily Mail (London), May 29, 2001 | Go to article overview

Scandal of the Pupils with No Textbooks


Behar, Darren, Daily Mail (London)


Byline: DARREN BEHAR

THE frightening shortage of school books for pupils was revealed in a study yesterday.

Astonishingly, two-thirds of youngsters aged 11 to 14 do not have textbooks for their homework and almost half have to share them during lessons.

The crisis has engulfed most subjects, according to research by the School Book Alliance, a coalition of teachers, parents and education experts that is demanding more books for secondary schools.

More than 75 per cent of the 34,000 children surveyed in England said they found it easier to learn if they provided their own books.

Alliance chairman Michael Marland said: 'It's a national disgrace that children are expected to do their homework without textbooks, particularly as those most affected are least likely to have their own resources for home research.' The study, conducted by academics at Keele University, found the biggest book shortages were in religious education, where 88 per cent of children had no textbooks for homework and 59 per cent had to share in class.

In English, there were no homework textbooks for 76 per cent of pupils while nearly three in five had to share in school.

The research showed that three-quarters of pupils had no science books to do their homework, while four in five had no geography textbook.

In class, almost 50 per cent shared science and geography textbooks while 45 per cent shared history books.

For maths, 45 per cent had no homework textbooks and 29 per cent had to share books in class.

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