Democracy Key to Stability, Growth in Mexico the Elections in Mexico of Last July 2000 Were a Victory for All of Society and Gave Rise to a New Stage in Mexico's History. the Mexican Nation Has Taken a Major Step Forward in Becoming the Country to Which It Has Always Aspired. A Country with Greater Development, Security and Opportunities. A Full-Fledged Nation That Is Successful and Sure of Itself

Korea Times (Seoul, Korea), June 4, 2001 | Go to article overview

Democracy Key to Stability, Growth in Mexico the Elections in Mexico of Last July 2000 Were a Victory for All of Society and Gave Rise to a New Stage in Mexico's History. the Mexican Nation Has Taken a Major Step Forward in Becoming the Country to Which It Has Always Aspired. A Country with Greater Development, Security and Opportunities. A Full-Fledged Nation That Is Successful and Sure of Itself


Now Mexicans must further develop their practices and strengthen their democratic institutions. Democracy is not only a formal process of casting votes at the polls, it must create favorable conditions for economic and social development. Through a consolidated democracy in Mexico the gap between those who have much and those who have little will diminish.

Along with the consolidation of democracy in Mexico, the government of President Vicente Fox also has the renewed commitment of scrupulously respecting human rights and contributing with the international community so that they are respected throughout the world.

That is why Mexico has set itself the goal of adopting a set of measures to strengthen respect for human rights in the domestic sphere, as well as promoting universal application of the international instruments in the field of human rights that have not been signed or ratified by all the States Parties to these instruments, or that are conditioned by reservations of different kinds.

With these ideals, Mexico's foreign relations are developing today with a new sense of dignity and effectiveness. What is done within Mexico is expressed and defended abroad, with the deep conviction that the values and transparency that are being promoted are the best proof of serious and responsible change in favor of the rights of individuals and communities in Mexico and other nations.

The consolidation of democratic institutions and respect for human rights are the most solid foundations for achieving flourishing economic growth that closes the gap between those in the forefront and those who have been left behind or excluded from development.

The dialogue, respect and political will characteristic of a democratic society are essential instruments for recovering consensus and confidence in the future. In the five months of President Vicente Fox's administration, Mexico has demonstrated the effectiveness of dialogue and communication in settling disputes.

The events that have taken place in Chiapas since 1994 highlighted the living conditions of indigenous peoples, who, despite being a fundamental part of Mexico, had been forgotten. Mexicans are aware that the construction of the new democratic national project with inclusive development will only be feasible if we address the demands of indigenous peoples and are able to establish a worthy and lasting peace in Chiapas.

Consequently, President Vicente Fox's government has given numerous signs of goodwill to promote dialogue with the Zapatista movement. First of all, by sending a bill on indigenous rights and culture to the Honorable Congress of the Union. Second, by backing the Zapatista march to Mexico City and the appearance of the Zapatistas before the Chamber of Deputies, because of the opportunity it offered to advance in settling the conflict. Third, by fully complying with the conditions set down by the Zapatista leaders to reinitiate the dialogue for peace.

Now is the time to speak face to face with honesty and commitment. The Mexican people know that the time for peace has arrived, for a just, worthy and definitive peace. The dialogue has been opened as the conflict is reaching an end. …

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Democracy Key to Stability, Growth in Mexico the Elections in Mexico of Last July 2000 Were a Victory for All of Society and Gave Rise to a New Stage in Mexico's History. the Mexican Nation Has Taken a Major Step Forward in Becoming the Country to Which It Has Always Aspired. A Country with Greater Development, Security and Opportunities. A Full-Fledged Nation That Is Successful and Sure of Itself
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