Chemists Decorate Nanotubes for Usefulness

By Gorman, J. | Science News, June 23, 2001 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Chemists Decorate Nanotubes for Usefulness


Gorman, J., Science News


In a step that could lead to harder materials and tinier electronic devices, researchers have found a promising new way to attach molecules to carbon nanotubes.

In its simplest form, a carbon nanotube is a one-atom-thick sheet of carbon curved into a cylinder. Such tubes exhibit extraordinary strength and electrical conductivity. For many potential uses of carbon nanotubes, chemists need to attach clusters of atoms, called functional groups, to the outsides of the tubes. The new report, which will appear in an upcoming issue of the JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY, demonstrates a novel way to do just that.

Researchers have had some success with adding functional groups to carbon nanotubes. But the new method is simpler and can attach a greater variety and number of groups, says research team member James M. Tour of Rice University in Houston. The process can attach a functional group to as many as 1 out of every 20 carbons on a nanotube, which can contain millions of carbon atoms.

Tour and his colleagues used a technique similar to one by which chemists link functional groups to graphite, which forms from flat sheets of carbon. The Rice researchers attached an electrode to apply a voltage to a mesh of carbon nanotubes known as bucky paper. Then, to link each type of chemical group to the nanotubes, they bathed the bucky paper in a solution containing a different aryl diazonium salt.

Each molecule of an aryl diazonium salt contains a six-carbon ring, to which the researchers had attached one of a variety of functional groups. Joined to one of the ring's five other carbon atoms was a different chemical group that the scientists expected would readily get knocked off as the molecule approached the charged bucky paper.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Chemists Decorate Nanotubes for Usefulness
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.