Jail Time for Jenna

By Walker, T. J. | The Humanist, July 2001 | Go to article overview

Jail Time for Jenna


Walker, T. J., The Humanist


I don't want to pick on Jenna Bush or her sister Barbara for their recent runins with the law. Really. I don't think they have a "problem" just because they want to have a beer when they are in college. In my day (ugh, I'm officially old), eighteen-year-old freshmen could buy beer in the basement of Duke University Chapel and our dorms--in fact, we were practically required to. But ...

Certain conservative politicians aligned with the forces of George W. Bush have done two things: first, they legislated it a crime in Texas for college kids to drink beer; second, they instituted a mandatory prison sentence for anyone in Texas found guilty of three small crimes.

Jenna was busted this past April on booze charges. Now she faces the charge of trying to buy alcohol again while underage. Additionally, she could face charges of using a fake I.D. That could be the third strike and she could be off to prison, perhaps for six months!

"Three strikes and you're out" sounds great if you are a zealous politician looking for a campaign slogan and you figure the consequences will only affect "those people," never anyone you know. But the Texas mandatory sentence guidelines were always ridiculous, and if George W. Bush now has time to reflect on this while preparing a birthday cake with a file inside for his daughter on prison visitors' day, then so much the better. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Jail Time for Jenna
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.