Profiling the Mature Fashion-Conscious Apparel Shopper

By Greco, Alan J.; Paksoy, Christie H. | Akron Business and Economic Review, Summer 1989 | Go to article overview

Profiling the Mature Fashion-Conscious Apparel Shopper


Greco, Alan J., Paksoy, Christie H., Akron Business and Economic Review


Profiling The Mature Fashion-Conscious Apparel Shopper

Market segmentation and submarket profiling are two widely used strategic marketing tools. While marketing research has addressed the segmenting of student and adult populations, only minor attention has been directed toward the identification and profiling of segments that may exist within the senior citizen market. The few attempts that have been made to profile mature consumers have treated this market as a homogeneous group relative to size, spending power, and media preference [6, 29] rather than as a heterogeneous market as suggested by Towle and Martin [50], Langer [24], Gelb [16], Baier [3, pp. 170-175], French and Fox [15], and Lumpkin [30]. This stream of research suggests that further examination of subsegments within the mature market is needed in order to more fully understand the shopping orientation and behavior of the mature consumer and to aid in the development of viable marketing mixes.

Fashion-consciousness has been used as a segmentation base, and profiles of fashion-conscious consumers have been developed for most market segments [13, 20, 37, 46]. The major focus of previous research has been on the defining and understanding of fashion-conscious segments as they relate to buyer behavior and promotional efforts. Activity, interest, and opinion statements have been utilized to identify and profile fashion-oriented market segments [19, 30, 39, 48]. None of these efforts, however, has developed profiles of older fashion-oriented shoppers and compared the findings with those of other age groups.

While not often associated with older shoppers, fashion-consciousness is a consumer attribute of potential value to marketers in segmentation and media planning efforts [21, 39]. Since a high proportion of active mature consumers has been found to be relatively heavy spenders for clothing [30, 49], it is likely that a fashion-conscious segment exists among older apparel shoppers. Moreover, the notions of cognitive reference age [4, 5] and patterns of adjustment to retirement [15] suggest that many older people see themselves as younger than their chronological age--preferring instead to identify themselves with the middle-aged--and, thus, may be likely to maintain an interest in apparel fashions.

BACKGROUND

Fashion Consciousness

Conceptually, fashion-consciousness suggests a degree of involvement in styles or fashions of clothing [46]. One need not be an opinion leader in the area of clothing fashions to be considered fashion-conscious. Nor, as Summers [46] has pointed out, is venturesomeness in clothing a necessary condition to fashion-consciousness or opinion leadership. Rather, fashion-consciousness is characterized by an interest in clothing fashions and in one's appearance [19].

Several studies provide empirical evidence of the existence of a fashion-conscious mature market segment. Martin [31] found that the majority of female respondents aged 60 years and older perceived themselves as fashion-conscious, and a high proportion said they enjoyed shopping for clothes. Another study reported that older shoppers maintain an interest in fashion and express a desire to look different from their peers [38, p. 173]. More recently, Lumpkin [30] found that about one in three mature male and female clothing shoppers could be categorized as "active apparel shoppers" who are socially active and interested in clothing fashions. These findings indicate that marketers should take a closer look at the mature market when formulating marketing strategies.

Fashion Consciousness and Aging

Social gerontologists generally agree that as a person ages, he or she passes through life course stages [2]. As persons progress from middle age (40-59 years) into the later maturity stage (late 50's to 75 years), they experience a reduction in formal societal roles such as retirement, children leaving home, and the death of friends or spouse. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Profiling the Mature Fashion-Conscious Apparel Shopper
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.