Jacksonville Neighborhoods Improve Child Welfare Service

By Heitfield, Heather | Nation's Cities Weekly, July 30, 2001 | Go to article overview

Jacksonville Neighborhoods Improve Child Welfare Service


Heitfield, Heather, Nation's Cities Weekly


Five neighborhoods in Jacksonville, Fla., representing 7,000 of the city's 700,000 people, have undergone noticeable child welfare changes within the past few years. Children and families are witnessing -- and actively participating in -- transformations in the way their communities are addressing child abuse and neglect.

These innovative efforts began with the Community Partnership for Protecting Children -- a collaboration between local and state leaders, social service providers, clergy members and business owners -- which has shown tremendous dedication to the protection of children and families.

When alarmed citizens in Jacksonville voiced their concerns about the Department of Children and Families, they urged the agency to focus more on providing families with necessary supportive services rather than just investigating reports of abuse or neglect. After a series of public hearings, the state of Florida modified its child welfare approach to include more comprehensive family assessments and evaluations following child abuse and neglect referrals.

Housed in one of the city's Full Service Schools, the Community Partnership is sustaining these child welfare changes by engaging five communities near the school in efforts to protect children and strengthen families.

The Partnership has mobilized tenant groups, local businesses, churches and neighborhood residents around local child protection efforts. Local residents have canvassed neighborhoods to identify existing community resources and needs, and then committed to providing designated high-risk areas with additional support services.

By working with community centers located in each neighborhood, the Partnership -- with support from the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation and the Center for the Study of Social Policy -- is helping children and families receive comprehensive educational, financial and social services from school social workers, child guidance therapists, teen counselors, family liaison workers, child protective service workers and other local organizations.

In addition to changes in neighborhood activities, child protection agency staff now works closely with neighborhood providers to extend additional services to families.

Families in Jacksonville can receive extensive support from friends and family living with in their own communities, which eliminates the need to involve child protective workers in low-risk cases.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Jacksonville Neighborhoods Improve Child Welfare Service
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.