Inside the Beltway

By McCaslin, John | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 10, 2001 | Go to article overview

Inside the Beltway


McCaslin, John, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Byline: John McCaslin

SALACIOUS INSIGHTS

Suffice it to say the Southeastern Legal Foundation, the public-interest law firm that successfully pursued law-license sanctions in Arkansas against Bill Clinton, won't be rushing out to buy the former president's promised book.

The Atlanta-based legal firm is slamming the $10 million to $12 million book-advance deal signed by Mr. Clinton as "a pure example of contemporary American public life - disgrace pays."

"The Clinton book deal confirms the darker angels of our national consciousness, that the market will pay for salacious insights into the most corrupt presidency of the second half of the 20th century," says Phil Kent, SLF's president. "It pays to be bad."

The best way for the American people to say goodbye to President Clinton, Mr. Kent suggests, is to "greet his book with a resounding silence."

TAKE TWO

And why shouldn't President Bush take a monthlong vacation?

Most Americans take scant time off and could benefit from more vacation time, experts say. An International Labor Organization study this year found the United States has overtaken Japan with the highest average annual hours worked - just under 2,000 hours per year - taking two vacation weeks tops. The typical vacation in Europe is four to six weeks.

Deborah Figart, an economics professor and co-author of the book "Working Time," says it's great Mr. Bush "can recoup his energy with long vacations. Now he should encourage policies so that other hard-working Americans can also have time for rest, family and other activities."

ERASING THE SOUTH

Jason Koehne had hoped the 250 pictures of tearing eyes he posted all over Chantilly would draw attention to the "inequities and suffering wrought upon Southern people."

He got the attention, if not the sympathy.

"Our history is being rewritten and or obliterated" in the guise of political correctness, complains Mr. Koehne, chairman of the Northern Virginia chapter of the League of the South. "As Southerners, we are forced to endure ridicule and scorn on a daily basis. Our people are verbally attacked in all aspects of American life."

Mr. Koehne attached color pictures of a tearing eye to street signs as a "peaceful attempt to bring light to these barbaric acts."

Why a tearing eye?

"The United States General Philip Sheridan," he says, "said in regard to the children, women and men of the South: `They must be left nothing but their eyes to weep with. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Inside the Beltway
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.