12 Playwrights and Theatres Receive 2000 NEA/TCG Residency Grant

American Theatre, March 2001 | Go to article overview

12 Playwrights and Theatres Receive 2000 NEA/TCG Residency Grant


Twelve playwrights and theatres have been selected for the 2000 NEA/TCG Theatre Residency Program for Playwrights, developed and administered by TCG in collaboration with the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), with additional support from Vivendi Universal. The program was created to afford playwrights the opportunity to create new work in residence at a host theatre and to become an integral part of the theatre's artistic life and community activities. Through support from the NEA, each of the 12 playwrights will receive $25,000. Each host theatre will receive a $5,000 Vivendi Universal Residency Award to enhance their ability to support the residencies. TCG will supply oversight, coordination, guidance and material assistance.

TCG's executive director, Ben Cameron, stated, "This year's grantees are an exciting, diverse group of writers and organizations, reflecting the vitality of American theatre today. In previous rounds of this program, we have been impressed by the creation of new work by gifted artists, and gratified to witness the deepening relationships between those playwrights, exemplary theatres and their communities. We are grateful to the National Endowment for the Arts for enabling TCG to continue offering playwrights greatly needed financial and artistic support. The NEA's ongoing commitment to the development of new works and the fostering of relationships between playwrights, theatres and their communities is invaluable. We greatly appreciate Vivendi Universal's support to theatres and their commitment to continuing the important program that Seagram/Universal began last year."

Gigi Bolt, director of theatre and musical theatre at the NEA, said, "Through its playwrights, the theatre reflects our lives and reveals truths. The NEA/TCG Theatre Residency Program for Playwrights was created to recognize the invaluable contribution of our writers. The Endowment has been gratified by the work that has been created since the program's inception and the relationships that have been forged between artists, institutions and community members. We are delighted to congratulate the 12 outstanding recipients of the 2000 awards."

Patsy Glazer, Vivendi Universal's vice president of public affairs, said, "Vivendi Universal is very pleased to continue our support to the NEA/TCG Theatre Residency Program for Playwrights. We think this program is a powerful force in forging partnerships between exceptional American playwrights and some of the leading not-for-profit theatres in the country.

The 2000 NEA/TCG Theatre Residency Program for Playwrights recipients are as follows:

Eric Bogosian, for a residency at Princeton's McCarter Theatre, to develop his new play, End of a World, about a group of five people in their thirties who get marooned in a country house during a massive regional blackout. Bogosian will also work with local high school students, taking them through the process of building characters and exploring the complex dynamics of multi-character playwriting.

Erik Ehn, for a residency at Perishable Theatre in Providence, R.I., to develop a pan-cultural ghost story written in response to oral histories gathered from immigrant populations in Rhode Island. The play will be developed from interviews and writing workshops with people in the community, with a special focus on economically marginalized recent adult immigrants.

W. David Hancock, for a residency at Frontera @ Hyde Park Theatre in Austin, to develop Immaterial Depositions, an audience-participatory murder mystery set in a country loosely based on Argentina; the play explores the systematic erasure of groups of people by a repressive government. Hancock will also conduct workshops with homeless teens affiliated with Project Phase, Austin's only homeless shelter dedicated exclusively to youth.

Jeffrey Hatcher, for a residency at Minneapolis's Children's Theatre Company, to develop The King of Children, a play based on the life and work of Janusz Korczak, the Polish writer, pediatrician and educator who started an orphanage for Jewish children in Warsaw in the early years of the 20th century. …

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