Peru: Former President Alberto Fujimori Charged with Crimes against Humanity

NotiSur - South American Political and Economic Affairs, September 7, 2001 | Go to article overview

Peru: Former President Alberto Fujimori Charged with Crimes against Humanity


The wheels of justice continue to turn against Peru's disgraced former President Alberto Fujimori (1990-2000). The Peruvian Congress has accused him of responsibility for two brutal massacres in the 1990s, and the attorney general has filed homicide charges against him. The government is pressuring Japan to cooperate in bringing the former president to trial, but so far the Japanese government has refused.

On Aug. 2, Peruvian Judge Jose Luis Lecaros declared Fujimori a fugitive from justice (reo ausente) and ordered his arrest. Fujimori has been in Japan since last November. He left Peru to escape a corruption scandal and faxed his resignation from Japan. Congress rejected his resignation, firing him for dereliction of duty (see NotiSur, 2000-12-08).

An official at Japan's Foreign Ministry said that, despite the arrest order, Japan would not extradite Fujimori because he is protected by his dual Japanese and Peruvian citizenship.

"We will respond according to Japanese law," the official said. Asked if this meant Fujimori would not be extradited because he is a Japanese citizen, he said, "It would depend on the situation, but, generally speaking, that's what it means."

"While Japan can take that position on principle, it is a signatory to a series of international treaties," said Prime Minister Roberto Danino. "When we have the legal route laid out and established, we will push their compliance with the treaties so Fujimori can be brought to justice."

Fujimori has said that he will not return to Peru because he is a victim of political persecution.

"The government...will give Mr. Fujimori every guarantee of a clean, just, and transparent trial before Peruvian courts," President Alejandro Toledo told reporters on Aug. 6.

Toledo said he wanted to encourage Japanese investment in Peru and sought a bilateral relationship of "mutual respect," but he also said Fujimori should be considered Peruvian.

"From our perspective, Fujimori was elected as a Peruvian, governed as a Peruvian, and...needs to face Peruvian courts," Toledo said. "Japan cannot buy his immunity with money."

Congress removes Fujimori's immunity

On Aug. 27, Congress convened a special session to debate the charges against Fujimori. That night, the lawmakers voted 75 to 0 to lift Fujimori's constitutional immunity. Deputy Martha Chavez, the ex-president's staunchest supporter and the only member of Congress to insist the motion was a "tremendous injustice," left the chamber before the vote.

In the vote, Congress accepted an investigative committee's report holding Fujimori responsible for the actions of the Grupo Colina, a paramilitary death squad allegedly run by jailed ex-spy chief Vladimiro Montesinos.

The report cited testimony from Fujimori's former military chiefs, former intelligence agents, and a secretly filmed videotape from 1998 in which Montesinos tells two former officials that the Colina massacres "came from" Fujimori.

The allegations include the 1991 murder of 15 people who were attending a party in the Barrios Altos district in Lima and the 1992 killing of nine university students and a professor at the Enrique Valle y Guzman University, known as La Cantuta. Fujimori granted amnesty to some of those convicted of murdering the La Cantuta victims and burying their bodies (see NotiSur, 1995-07-07).

Committee chair Deputy Daniel Estrada of Union por el Peru said evidence showed clearly that the death-squad killings were part of the Fujimori government's strategy to defeat the guerrillas. The massacres "could not have occurred without the consent of the highest spheres of power," Estrada said.

The government said the vote should make it easier to force Fujimori's return from Japan to stand trial for crimes against humanity.

"The possibility of extradition would be much more concrete [with the congressional vote]. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Peru: Former President Alberto Fujimori Charged with Crimes against Humanity
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.