Impressionism

By Hubbard, Guy | Arts & Activities, September 2001 | Go to article overview

Impressionism


Hubbard, Guy, Arts & Activities


THINGS TO LEARN

* Impressionism is a style of painting in which artists paint the ordinary scenes that lie in front of them. The original Impressionists were interested in everyday sights found on nearby streets, in the quiet countryside or inside cafes and theaters. They usually completed a painting on a single occasion, unlike most artists of the time who first made sketches and then went back to their studios to complete a picture.

* While most artists of the time painted objects very carefully, Impressionist painters recognized that daylight caused the appearance of images to continually change. As a result, they tried to capture on canvas what was happening in a fleeting moment of time. To do this, they focused attention on the effects created by light as it was reflected from objects, rather than on the solidness of the shapes themselves. Buildings, trees, bridges and people, therefore, usually had indistinct outlines.

* Because Impressionist painters had to work quickly, oil paint was usually put on the canvas in small dabs or short strokes, often with little color mixing. These bright, frequently unmixed colors appeared to blend together in the finished painting to make people think the paint had really been mixed in advance.

* Many people believe that Impressionism was the most important idea to happen to art since the Italian Renaissance, 500 years before. At that time, Classical art had been rediscovered after being forgotten for 1,000 years. But Impressionism did not just happen. The leaders of this new movement developed their ideas by studying the pictures of other artists, most importantly two Englishmen, John Constable and J.M.W. Turner.

Further ideas came from a group of landscape artists who had worked in the village of Barbizon, near Paris, France, and also Edouard Manet, who believed that art should portray what an artist actually saw.

* The names of the original French Impressionists are Claude Monet, Camille Pissarro, Pierre Renoir, Alfred Sisley and Edgar Degas. Pissarro was their leading thinker. However, each artist painted quite differently while working toward similar goals.

* Later, three other artists took the ideas of Impressionism and changed them to create other art movements. Paintings by Paul Cezanne are called "Post-Impressionism." Those by Paul Gauguin are examples of "Symbolism." And a group of artists, under the leadership of Georges Seurat, used a system of painting called "Pointillism" (or "Neo-Impressionism").

* Probably the best-known American Impressionist is Mary Cassatt, who worked in France with the original French artists. Many American artists adopted Impressionism, however, and in 1898, Childe Hassam and nine other New York Impressionists joined together and called themselves "The Ten. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Impressionism
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.