A Closer Look at Resumes

By Messmer, Max | Strategic Finance, September 2001 | Go to article overview

A Closer Look at Resumes


Messmer, Max, Strategic Finance


It's understood that a resume is meant to point out a job applicant's strengths and downplay any weaknesses. While it would be helpful to have all the facts up front, you're not likely to see bulleted statements such as "not always a team player" or "needs to enhance people skills." These are things you'll have to try and discover during the interview process.

Although it can be difficult to determine from a surrie whether a candidate is a good fit for the job, there are techniques that can help you make better decisions about whom to call for interviews. What's essential is that your screening process is consistent and thorough.

Start with a system

Make sure you clarify the job requirements of the position for which you're hiring. Determine which qualifications and attributes are essential for high performance and which are less critical, but desired, skills. For example, you may prefer applicants who possess an MBA, but someone with equivalent work experience may be just as qualifled. If you set standards that are too rigid, you might overlook talented candidates.

By carefully defining your needs, you'll also be able to apply the same criteria to all resumes. With clear standards in mind, you can quickly identify those applicants best suited for the job.

Neatness counts

While you might not critique the layout or overall look of an accounting professional's resume the same way you would one submitted by someone applying for a job as a graphic designer, it's important not to discount these elements altogether. A resume with a messy appearance could indicate a lack of professionalism or attention to detail.

Take note of any typos or misspellings. One of the qualities you want in any accounting candidate is accuracy. In a survey by our company, 76% of executives said they wouldn't hire a candidate with even one or two typographical errors in his or her resume.

Pay attention to resume styles

Most resumes are organized in either a chronological or functional format. Those arranged chronologically have the most recent work experience listed first, followed by previous jobs. Functional resumes are organized based on skills and expertise.

With chronological resumes look carefully at the length of employment in jobs listed and gaps in work history. If there are unexplained breaks, be sure to ask about them during the interview process. There is most likely a reasonable explanation, such as time off to raise a family, but look for signs that the applicant may be deliberately hiding something.

When assessing functional resumes pay attention to what may be missing from the document. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Closer Look at Resumes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.