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By Goldberg, Jerry; Dawkins, Wayne et al. | The Masthead, Fall 2001 | Go to article overview

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Goldberg, Jerry, Dawkins, Wayne, McGoun, Bill, Cavett, Van, The Masthead


RE: Don Wright's cartoon, Palm Beach Post, March 2001

Did anybody out there publish the Wright cartoon showing a Palestinian mother and child being attacked by an Israeli jet? I have gotten lots of angry phone calls and am wondering if others have had the same reaction from their readers. Also, any thoughts on whether the cartoon was out of bounds? Thanks.

Jerry Goldberg, Editorial Page Editor

The Buffalo News

Dear Gerald,

I received the cartoon but I waited. I wanted to see coverage that explained it.

Now I'm going with two op-eds on the Mideast. Both pieces, pro and con, note deaths of Palestinian civilians by U.S.-made Israeli bombs.

I'm not going with Wright, but with a similar toon by Mike Ramirez (LA Times) showing an Israeli jet shooting large Israeli shoes in the foot.

Wayne Dawkins, Associate Editor

Daily Press, Newport News, Va.

The Palm Beach Post, Wright's home newspaper, got considerable reaction to the cartoon, enough for the ombudsman column the following day and to fill the

letters space the day after. Most was negative, which is not surprising, as the Post is published in a county of 1.2 million that is roughly 25 percent Jewish. The Post stood by the cartoon.

So do I; I think it's a valid point that just because Palestinian terrorists kill Jewish civilians that doesn't make it right for the Israeli government to kill Palestinian civilians, especially with U. …

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